Integral help

  • Thread starter Giuseppe
  • Start date
I was wondering what the best way to do this integral was:

Integral of 1+sin(x) all over cos(x)^2

Is subsitution the best way?
 
The easiest way is to write the fraction as the sum of fractions ((a+b)/c = a/c + b/c)) and integrate the first and second terms of the sum separately. One is a basic antiderivative and the other is a simple substitution.
 

TD

Homework Helper
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So what hypermorphism means is that you do:

[tex]\int {\frac{{1 + \sin x}}{{\cos ^2 x}}} dx = \int {\frac{1}{{\cos ^2 x}}} dx + \int {\frac{{\sin x}}{{\cos ^2 x}}} dx[/tex]

As he said, the first one is a standard antiderivative, for the second one try [itex]y = \cos x[/itex]
 

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