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Integrate e^(-r^2)

  1. May 23, 2007 #1

    Zurtex

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    Last edited: May 23, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. May 24, 2007 #2

    Gib Z

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    From memory the Gaussian integral is from infinity to negative infinity..if you want something that act's as an anti derivative, try the Error Function ( erf(x) )

    EDIT: ~sigh~ I just realised the erf(x) also has bounds, my bad.
     
  4. May 29, 2007 #3

    Zurtex

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    Thanks, the problem was actually in response to a house mate on a physics course who had this integral and was utterly perplexed how one would integrate it from negative to positive infinity. I remembered it was a standard integral but forgot the details how to do it, anyway in the end it turned out he was integrating over the wrong co-ordinates anyway and it was much more simple once he transformed the integral.

    But thanks for trying :smile:
     
  5. May 29, 2007 #4

    uart

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  6. May 29, 2007 #5
    how about integrating it wrt x. Easy!
     
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