Integrate e^(-r^2)

  • Thread starter Zurtex
  • Start date
  • #1
Zurtex
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,120
1
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Gib Z
Homework Helper
3,352
6
From memory the Gaussian integral is from infinity to negative infinity..if you want something that act's as an anti derivative, try the Error Function ( erf(x) )

EDIT: ~sigh~ I just realized the erf(x) also has bounds, my bad.
 
  • #3
Zurtex
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,120
1
From memory the Gaussian integral is from infinity to negative infinity..if you want something that act's as an anti derivative, try the Error Function ( erf(x) )

EDIT: ~sigh~ I just realized the erf(x) also has bounds, my bad.

Thanks, the problem was actually in response to a house mate on a physics course who had this integral and was utterly perplexed how one would integrate it from negative to positive infinity. I remembered it was a standard integral but forgot the details how to do it, anyway in the end it turned out he was integrating over the wrong co-ordinates anyway and it was much more simple once he transformed the integral.

But thanks for trying :smile:
 
  • #5
theperthvan
184
0
how about integrating it wrt x. Easy!
 

Suggested for: Integrate e^(-r^2)

  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
577
Replies
4
Views
279
Replies
8
Views
471
Replies
2
Views
964
Replies
1
Views
861
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
172
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
764
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
428
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
427
Top