Integrating factor

  • Thread starter Ry122
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  • #1
565
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In the following problem how does -g end up becoming -g(m/g)?
Isn't the derivative of -g just (-g^2/2)?
http://users.on.net/~rohanlal/integfact.jpg [Broken]
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
I'm having trouble reading the scan, but from what I can tell, the factor of (m/c?) came from integrating the exponential, and g is constant with respect to the variable t. Then again, I don't have any context either.
 
  • #3
81
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Yes, in this case g is a constant because you are integrating with respect to t. If you were integrating with respect to g (no clue why you would because I strongly suspect that this is the gravitational constant) then everything else would be a constant and you would get -g^2/2.
 
  • #4
565
2
Shouldn't I also have to find the integral of g, which would be gt?
 

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