Interesting problem, but hard

In summary, the conversation discusses upcoming experiments that aim to constrain our understanding of cosmology and dark energy. These include the DES, PanSTARRS, LSST, and SNAP surveys, which will use various methods to measure different parameters of the universe. It is uncertain if a space-based satellite is necessary for these measurements. The DES specifically focuses on determining if dark energy can be described as a cosmological constant, while the other surveys aim to measure various aspects of cosmology. Further details can be found on the respective websites.
  • #1
SupersonicMan
3
0
Interesting problem I came across, yet I'm having some trouble with it:

Here are a few of the next generation of experiments currently being planned for constraining cosmological models. Not all of these are groundbased:

DES:https://www.darkenergysurvey.org/"
PanSTARRS:http://pan-starrs.ifa.hawaii.edu/public/"
LSST:http://www.lsst.org"
SNAP: http://snap.lbl.gov"

What are four methods these surveys will use to constrain cosmology/dark-energy (not all of the use four methods, I'm assuming). For each of these, is making the measurement from a space-based satellite necessary or warranted?
 
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  • #2
These sound an awful lot like homework problems. Have you tried searching those websites? What have you gleaned from them so far?
 
  • #3
The DES is primarily asking if dark energy can be a cosmological constant. However, I am a little uncertain about what exactly it means by "constraining cosmology/dark energy?
 
  • #4
SupersonicMan said:
The DES is primarily asking if dark energy can be a cosmological constant. However, I am a little uncertain about what exactly it means by "constraining cosmology/dark energy?

"Constraining cosmology" simply means that it's attempting to measure the parameters that we use to describe our universe. This could be, for example, the total matter content, the expansion rate, or the dark energy density. If you read further into the website, you should be able to determine these details. I suggest you do that first and then ask questions about other things you don't understand.
 

1. What makes this problem interesting?

This problem is interesting because it challenges our current understanding and requires us to think critically and creatively to find a solution. It also has real-world applications and potential to make a significant impact.

2. Why is this problem considered hard?

This problem is considered hard because it may involve complex mathematical or scientific concepts, require advanced technology or resources, or have multiple variables and unknown factors that make it difficult to solve.

3. How do scientists approach a hard problem like this?

Scientists approach a hard problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable parts. They also use the scientific method, which involves making observations, formulating hypotheses, conducting experiments, and analyzing data to reach a conclusion.

4. Is it possible for a hard problem to have more than one solution?

Yes, it is possible for a hard problem to have multiple solutions. In fact, this is often the case in scientific research as different approaches and perspectives can lead to different solutions. It is important for scientists to critically evaluate and compare these solutions to determine the most accurate and effective one.

5. How do scientists know when they have solved a hard problem?

Scientists know they have solved a hard problem when they can provide evidence and data to support their solution. This solution should also be able to accurately predict and explain the observed phenomenon or solve the initial problem. It is also important for the solution to be replicable and withstand criticism and further testing.

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