Interference of light

  • Thread starter k9b4
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  • #1
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How can light interfere with other light? I thought EM radiation only interacts with charges?

Is it because, at your eye, the EM waves are out of phase? So the EM waves don't 'delete' each other, they both exist in superposition with each other, and one EM wave is pushing the electron one way, and the other pushing the other way, so the net effect is 0?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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Classical electromagnetic waves are vector quantities, which add in a vector fashion. So yes, interference is due to multiple waves superimposed, with the proper amplitude and phases such that the net field at a particular position is zero.
 
  • #3
109
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Classical electromagnetic waves are vector quantities, which add in a vector fashion. So yes, interference is due to multiple waves superimposed, with the proper amplitude and phases such that the net field at a particular position is zero.
Thanks
 

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