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Internal Forces (Engineering Mechanics)

  1. Oct 29, 2005 #1
    problem says knowing radius of each pulley to be 7.2 in, neglect friction, find internal forces at point J of the frame.

    1st question that I have is whether the tension in section C-E of the cable also 90 lb? how about section C-D. Also, in my diagram of each of the members, I don't know how to label forces at point E where two long members and the pulley meet.

    Finally, can someone gimme an idea how to go about doing this problem?
    http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/8272/15am.jpg
    http://img487.imageshack.us/img487/4066/14ch.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Oct 29, 2005
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 29, 2005 #2

    Pyrrhus

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    Are points J and K joints? I think they are assuming pulleys have mass.
     
  4. Oct 29, 2005 #3
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2005
  5. Oct 29, 2005 #4

    Pyrrhus

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    Yes, i'm familiar with internal forces [resultants of the stresses] (axial, shear and flexionant moment). First is to find the reactions and simply cut BE member at J, and solve for the shear force and flexionant moment.
     
  6. Nov 1, 2005 #5
    I beleive you dont need to take pulleys into consideration you just find all the force around the member where point J is.
    Then you just cut at point J and calculate everything again
     
  7. Nov 1, 2005 #6
    I'm having trouble finding the vertical component of the force acting on frame B...any ideas? I set the moment about A zero and I was able to find the horizontal component of the force acting on frame B.
     
  8. Nov 1, 2005 #7

    Pyrrhus

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    Find the joint forces (E point) on the AE member then use them to find the vertical component of the reaction at B on the BE member.
     
  9. Nov 1, 2005 #8
    I got 45 lb for the vertical component of the reaction force. is that right? :confused:
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2005
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