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International Grad school?

  1. May 18, 2014 #1
    Hi, i'm wondering whether it's harder to find a job or get accepted to a PhD program after obtaining a MS degree outside of states.
    Does the employer or adcom treat people who obtained a degree outside of states as an international applicant regardless of citizenship?
     
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  3. May 19, 2014 #2

    Meir Achuz

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    If you want physics, it is better to go directly into a PhD program, than getting masters and then applying for the PhD program.
     
  4. May 19, 2014 #3
    Is it okay to get a Masters degree overseas?
    Will it be a disadvantage when it comes to applying for grad school or jobs?
     
  5. May 20, 2014 #4
    I think that in other countries, you have to get a Masters before you can apply for a PhD, anyways. I think the thing is that the Masters and PhD programs are both shorter as compared to the States where you can apply directly for a PhD, but that takes about as long as both the Masters and PhD programs in other countries combined.

    I'm definitely not 100% sure about that, though. I remember reading something like that somewhere... If I remember what it was, I will post.
     
  6. May 21, 2014 #5
    The usual European model is (there is some variation between countries, but the following is the most common):
    Bachelor: 3 years
    Masters (not optional): 2 years
    PhD: 3 years
    While the American model is:
    Bachelor: 4 years
    PhD: 4-5 years

    So it works out to about the same. From what I hear you are not disadvantaged in American graduate school admissions by having a 3-year bachelor + 2-year masters (I did this, and felt I was evaluated fairly). If you are an international student it is really the only viable way to prepare yourself for grad school, so it doesn't raise any questions.

    However if you did a 4-year bachelor (US) + 2-year master (international), then it would raise some questions about why you bothered with the masters given that the standard path is to apply for PhD spot after the bachelor. I have never been part of evaluating applications so I can't say how heavily stuff like this matters, but from speaking to people who have I know that they at least would like an answer to why you took the non-standard path.
     
  7. May 21, 2014 #6
    A related question that one may ask is: if I leave my PhD program in the US with a master's degree to go pursue a PhD in Europe (for whatever reason, like maybe I think the research in my subfield is better there and I want to live in another culture for a bit), what difficulties will I encounter when looking to return to the US and find a job?
     
  8. May 22, 2014 #7

    Maylis

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    Masters degrees are not optional? Like having a bachelors in engineering in Europe would not be enough preparation for an engineering firm to hire a prospective employee?

    I am studying engineering in the USA and have thought about going the nonstandard route of doing graduate work in Europe or South Africa. My reason is that I like to travel and take the road less traveled, so this is an interesting thread to me personally.
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2014
  9. May 22, 2014 #8
    Another question (sorry, everyone): if one were eventually seeking employment in Europe, would it be better to go to Grad School in Europe as well, or would it be just as viable to stay in America? I'm thinking from an experimental research standpoint.
     
  10. May 22, 2014 #9
    In the uk a separate masters course is pretty much a waste of time. Normally it's BSc (3years) or MSc/MMath (4years) then PhD (3 to 4 years) and the world is your oyster. If you want to drag it out as you have nothing better to do you can stick a 1 year masters in between...
     
  11. May 22, 2014 #10

    Maylis

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    So someone with a bachelors in the USA is equivalent to a masters in the UK?
     
  12. May 22, 2014 #11

    micromass

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    No. A masters in the USA is equivalent to a masters in Europe.
     
  13. May 22, 2014 #12

    Maylis

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    According to post #9, it takes 4 years to get a masters degree in the UK. It would take 4 years for a bachelors in USA. Do you mean that they just get more done in the UK than the US with the time they have?
     
  14. May 22, 2014 #13

    micromass

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    Yes. The reason is that in the US you have to take many Gen Eds. So you have to take classes on psychology, writing and whatever you choose. This is mandatory. This is not mandatory in Europe.

    So if you count 1 full year for all the Gen Eds, then you spend about 5 years for a masters in the USA. This is exactly the time you also spend for a masters in Europe (whether a masters is 1 or 2 years depends on the specific university).
     
  15. May 22, 2014 #14
    If this is in response to my post, then please let me clear up that what I meant was that it is not optional if you want to obtain a PhD subsequently. There is nothing stopping you from just getting a Bachelor degree if you don't intend to pursue a PhD.

    I have no experience with engineering, so I have no idea how engineering firms view a Bachelor in Engineering as compared to a Masters in Engineering.
     
  16. May 22, 2014 #15

    Maylis

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    My apologies for my ignorance of the subject if university in Europe. My impression was that doing 3 years in the UK was the same as 3 years in the USA, so I thought it quite strange that I could just do three years of coursework and I would be ready to go into the workforce, thought I might be missing some coursework that one would normally take in the US during the last year.

    The difference between me and the OP is that the op is saying to do a masters in Europe then return to the USA for a phd. But I am thinking of doing all graduate work in Europe or South Africa or both.

    Is there any sense in doing a bachelors in the US then coming for a masters and phd in Europe? I had previously thought the first year of masters in Europe is the same as the last year of bachelors in the USA so I would be retaking the same classes again if I came to Europe. It seems that is not the case.
     
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