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Intro type QM book?

  1. Dec 8, 2005 #1
    Does anyone know an especially good book/textbook on quantum mechanics that is written for an audience with first year physics knowledge?

    I will be donig 2nd year QM next year so a book that describes QM well but obviously not a thorough treatment.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 9, 2005 #2

    robphy

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    I like French and Taylor's Intro to Quantum Physics text.
     
  4. Dec 9, 2005 #3
    Check out Eisberg and Resnick. I have heard good things about it, but it might be a bit too much for you.

    - harsh
     
  5. Dec 9, 2005 #4

    dextercioby

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    Try one of the early editions of Schiff's book. The QM intro course for chemists written by Linus Pauling in 1935 is also useful.

    U should know some high level mathematics, though...

    Daniel.
     
  6. Dec 10, 2005 #5
    Fantastic books but i doubt someone with just first year physics knowledge could grasp these books. I would have to vote for "An introduction to quantum physics" by French and Taylor as well, a good intro to the world of quantum mechanics. I used this book first.
     
  7. Dec 10, 2005 #6

    jtbell

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    Where are you studying, and what book will you be using in that course?

    At most colleges and universities in the USA, second-year physics majors don't take a full course in QM, as far as I know. Instead, they take an "introduction to modern physics" course that includes some QM. There are several textbooks at this level, e.g. Beiser or Krane or Taylor/Zafiriatos/Dubson. I think most standalone QM textbooks are ained at the third/fourth year level, and are easier to follow if the student has been through an "intro modern" course already.
     
  8. Dec 10, 2005 #7

    Dr Transport

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    French and Taylor is a good text. McGervey is also good. Stay away from Griffiths. Schaums outline is really cheap and has a load of problems and solutions.
     
  9. Dec 10, 2005 #8

    Tom Mattson

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    The Schaum's outline is almost certainly too advanced for anyone who has only had 1 year of physics.

    I would recommend Krane's Modern Physics if you have not yet taken differential equations and linear algebra. If you do have that much math then I would recommend either Eisberg and Resnick's Quantum Physics or Brehm and Mullin's Introduction to the Structure of Matter. Both books are good, but I recommend Eisberg and Resnick more highly because it includes perturbation theory, while Brehm and Mullin does not.
     
  10. Dec 10, 2005 #9
    Why? It seemed to be just fine to me.
     
  11. Dec 10, 2005 #10

    Tom Mattson

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    I've heard good things about it too, but it is certainly too advanced for this student.
     
  12. Dec 10, 2005 #11
    By far the easiest QM text of them all is Michael Morrison's "Understanding Quantum Physics-- A Users Manual."
     
  13. Dec 11, 2005 #12

    CarlB

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    Be sure and pick up Feynman's inexpensive paperback "QED: The Strange Theory of Matter and Light". Nothing explains quantum mechanics better for a beginning student. No equations, but he explains Feynman diagrams even. It really is a fantastic piece of "physics for poets" that only Feynman could put together.

    On the other hand, if you want a reference that will remain on your shelf forever, but is still readable at the very earliest level, get Albert Messiah's two volume set, now packaged in a single paperback.

    Carl
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2005
  14. Dec 11, 2005 #13

    Dr Transport

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    I do not like his style of presentation...
     
  15. Dec 12, 2005 #14
    Thanks for all the suggestions. My prescribed textbook is
    R A Serway, C J Moses and C A Moyer, Modern Physics. Saunders
    I am working through the QM bit by myself at the moment but would like to complement it with better books on the topic. I would also like to have a broader understanding of the subject other than picking which formula to use but that will only come with practice I guess.
     
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