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Inverse Laplace Transform

  1. Sep 12, 2010 #1
    Hey everyone.

    I've got through most of a problem that involves finding an inverse laplace transform, but I am stuck at one part that requires algebraic manipulation. The function is

    1/[s(2s2+2s+1)]

    So far I have modified it too look like .5/[s(s+.5)2 +.52](1/.5)

    I'm not sure how to modify the function with that extra s in the denominator.

    I had seen that the function could be transformed into (1/s) - [(s+.5)+.5]/[(s+.5)2+.52 and then from that the inverse Laplace could be easily obtained, but I am not sure how this transformation was done. I am sure there is a property I'm not thinking of, but any help on this would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 12, 2010 #2
    You can consider like this
    [tex]
    \frac{1}{s(s+a)^2}=\frac{A}{s}+\frac{Bs+C}{(s+a)^2}
    [/tex]
    From the above equation find A, B and C values by substituting different values of s.
     
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