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Inverse Trig Functions + their derivatives

  1. Oct 30, 2005 #1
    I really have no idea how to do these 3 questions, my prof didn't teach them at all, and i didn't understand the notes corresponding to them. Any help would be appreciated, thanks!
    [​IMG]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2005 #2

    Integral

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    What do you have for the definition of the sin-1(x) ?
     
  4. Oct 30, 2005 #3

    sin-1(x) = 1/sqrt(1-x^2)
     
  5. Oct 30, 2005 #4

    Integral

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    How about something like, "the angle whose sin is x"?
    Also it would be a big help if you would take a few minutes and learn to use the LaTex codes for writing equations,here.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2005
  6. Oct 31, 2005 #5

    CarlB

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    The functions he's asking you to graph are inverse functions, so as long as the range of one matches the domain of the other, they're going to graph like y=x. But he's given you a sufficiently large range that the functions are going to have discontinuities. You're going to get some sort of functions that will look like saw teeth.

    If you have a calcuator, you can use this to chart a few dozen points and get to see what is going on. Make sure ou get the values at the points where the functions break right! That means a filled in circle and an empty circle.

    As an example, a graph of [tex]\sqrt(x^2)[/tex] is the same as a graph of [tex]|x|[/tex]. The break in this case is at [tex]x=0[/tex], and the graph changes direction at that point. Your problems are harder because they are trig, but you're going to get a bunch of straight lines with slopes of +1 and or -1.

    Carl
     
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