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Ionized Arm Band

  1. Sep 3, 2006 #1
    Recently I saw an infomercial for an ionized arm band thing which is supposed to improve your health. It seems like people think its works, and it supposedly has a patent on it, but how it works (if it does at all) was not explained in any detail. Does anyone know anything about this? I could not find any links. I suppose a strong magnetic field might realign certain materials in the blood, but whether or not this would make you feel 'good' I have no idea.

    Thanks,
    -scott
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 3, 2006 #2

    DaveC426913

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    Snake oil.
     
  4. Sep 10, 2006 #3

    Those magnet therapies are complete bunk. For example, the ones meant to be worn on the wrist have strips of alternating polarity--to create a strong low range field, that doesn't wipe your credit cards in your pockets. It also doesn't reach through the skin.
     
  5. Sep 10, 2006 #4
    Hmm, what does electrostatic ionization have to do with ferromagnets?
     
  6. Sep 10, 2006 #5
    I'm intrigued, where can I get some of these oils, and what snake species are they from?
     
  7. Sep 10, 2006 #6

    Evo

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    For my ex husband it was expensive sunglasses. He'd go out and pay $300 for a pair of non-prescription designer sunglasses and feel great until the next day when he'd leave them at an over priced trendy restaurant, so he'd have to purchase another pair so he'd feel good again. :rolleyes: Same thing as the Ionized arm band.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2006
  8. Sep 10, 2006 #7

    russ_watters

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    Except that sunglasses (expensive or not) actually do something for you...
     
  9. Sep 11, 2006 #8

    turbo

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    You need to hook up with an actual man. If I (or most of the guys I hang with) had $300 burning a hole in my pocket (and I would 99% rather bank it than spend it) I would spend it on a chain saw (already have a great one), a chop saw (I would like to have one), a new seat for my Harley (my wife would like a touring seat), or pehaps a hunting bow or an accessory for my telescope.
     
  10. Sep 11, 2006 #9

    DaveC426913

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    Send me a cheque (anything with 3 digits or more will be fine). I will send you some bottles - they'll look like Evian bottles, but don't let that fool you. Trust me.
     
  11. Sep 11, 2006 #10

    JamesU

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  12. Sep 11, 2006 #11
    It's the old placebo effect. If you believe a pill, or tonic, or armband will make you feel better, then it will make you feel better, psychologically. If you feel better psychologically, you will start feeling better physically, too: you'll feel you have more energy and stamina and strength.

    If so, what's the problem? If it works, why question it? 1.) So long as people aren't aware this is what's going on it leaves them vulnerable to being financially exploited ($300.00 sunglasses?!?!) and 2.)there is always the risk they'll find out they've been had, which will just send them into depression, reversing any good effects it's had.

    Better to get your feelings of well being from things that are authentically beneficial: good nutrition, exercise, all that stuff.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2006
  13. Sep 11, 2006 #12

    Evo

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    I've tried but they keep escaping. :frown:
     
  14. Sep 11, 2006 #13

    Alkatran

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    It's an ethical issue. If all you're selling is the placebo effect, why does it cost so much?
     
  15. Sep 11, 2006 #14
    I thought that's what I said when I answered my own question:
     
  16. Sep 11, 2006 #15

    chroot

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    My father owns and operates one of the last independent pharmacies in Charlotte, NC. He's firmly an "above board" kind of gentleman, but recently has had scores of pain-management customers asking (pleading?) to sell them such wrist-magnets. Apparently some of the magnet companies will only sell through retailers, because they want to propagate an image of reputability.

    My father told them time and time again that the magnets couldn't possibly do anything, and he couldn't bring himself to profit from selling them some item which he believed could not help them at all.

    They eventually put enough pressure on him that he decided to begin selling the magnets despite himself -- at his own cost. He patiently explains to each and every customer who requests the magnets that, in his professional opinion, they're nothing but quackery, and that the company which makes them is robbing them. (And pharmacists are consistently the number one most trusted profession in the country!) They listen, nod, and clear out his inventory within a day or two of each shipment.

    - Warren
     
  17. Sep 11, 2006 #16
    On the surface this is inexplicable and I think it would be well worth it for someone to dig into what's going on there - track these customers down and find out why they're buying these things despite their pharmacist's explicit advice against it, and warnings that they're being had.
     
  18. Sep 11, 2006 #17

    Alkatran

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    That would be because belief that magnets work goes hand in hand with the idea that "big pharma" is covering up the fact that magnets work. To them, the deluded pharmacist is clearly just spouting off the massive's corporation smear campaign.
     
  19. Sep 11, 2006 #18

    chroot

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    It's probably because they're suffering from debilitating pain that is not responding well to traditional (pharmaceutical) treatment, so they're willing to toss $50 into ANYTHING that might provide some relief, imagined or otherwise.

    It's sad to see, but I suppose they've only got $50 to lose, and everything to gain.

    - Warren
     
  20. Sep 11, 2006 #19

    chroot

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    Yeah, er, or that.

    - Warren
     
  21. Sep 11, 2006 #20
    Yeah, between these two reasons you guys have probably hit the nail on the head.

    Starting from scratch, with no knowledge of physics, the average person would have a difficult time uncovering the fact that a static magnetic field has no appreciable effect on the human body. Magnets seem inherently magic if you sit and play with them; easy to leverage into snake oil.
     
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