Ionized Arm Band

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Main Question or Discussion Point

Recently I saw an infomercial for an ionized arm band thing which is supposed to improve your health. It seems like people think its works, and it supposedly has a patent on it, but how it works (if it does at all) was not explained in any detail. Does anyone know anything about this? I could not find any links. I suppose a strong magnetic field might realign certain materials in the blood, but whether or not this would make you feel 'good' I have no idea.

Thanks,
-scott
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
DaveC426913
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Snake oil.
 
  • #3
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scott_alexsk said:
Recently I saw an infomercial for an ionized arm band thing which is supposed to improve your health. It seems like people think its works, and it supposedly has a patent on it, but how it works (if it does at all) was not explained in any detail. Does anyone know anything about this? I could not find any links. I suppose a strong magnetic field might realign certain materials in the blood, but whether or not this would make you feel 'good' I have no idea.

Thanks,
-scott

Those magnet therapies are complete bunk. For example, the ones meant to be worn on the wrist have strips of alternating polarity--to create a strong low range field, that doesn't wipe your credit cards in your pockets. It also doesn't reach through the skin.
 
  • #4
Rach3
franznietzsche said:
Those magnet therapies are complete bunk. For example, the ones meant to be worn on the wrist have strips of alternating polarity--to create a strong low range field, that doesn't wipe your credit cards in your pockets. It also doesn't reach through the skin.
Hmm, what does electrostatic ionization have to do with ferromagnets?
 
  • #5
Rach3
DaveC426913 said:
Snake oil.
I'm intrigued, where can I get some of these oils, and what snake species are they from?
 
  • #6
Evo
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For my ex husband it was expensive sunglasses. He'd go out and pay $300 for a pair of non-prescription designer sunglasses and feel great until the next day when he'd leave them at an over priced trendy restaurant, so he'd have to purchase another pair so he'd feel good again. :rolleyes: Same thing as the Ionized arm band.
 
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  • #7
russ_watters
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Except that sunglasses (expensive or not) actually do something for you...
 
  • #8
turbo
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Evo said:
For my ex husband it was expensive sunglasses. He'd go out and pay $300 for a pair of non-prescription designer sunglasses and feel great until the next day when he'd leave them at an over priced trendy restaurant, so he'd have to purchase another pair so he'd feel good again. :rolleyes: Same thing as the Ionized arm band.
You need to hook up with an actual man. If I (or most of the guys I hang with) had $300 burning a hole in my pocket (and I would 99% rather bank it than spend it) I would spend it on a chain saw (already have a great one), a chop saw (I would like to have one), a new seat for my Harley (my wife would like a touring seat), or pehaps a hunting bow or an accessory for my telescope.
 
  • #9
DaveC426913
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Rach3 said:
I'm intrigued, where can I get some of these oils, and what snake species are they from?
Send me a cheque (anything with 3 digits or more will be fine). I will send you some bottles - they'll look like Evian bottles, but don't let that fool you. Trust me.
 
  • #10
JamesU
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http://www.qray.com/Default.aspx [Broken]

pretty fake, the people on their commercials can't act anyway
 
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  • #11
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It's the old placebo effect. If you believe a pill, or tonic, or armband will make you feel better, then it will make you feel better, psychologically. If you feel better psychologically, you will start feeling better physically, too: you'll feel you have more energy and stamina and strength.

If so, what's the problem? If it works, why question it? 1.) So long as people aren't aware this is what's going on it leaves them vulnerable to being financially exploited ($300.00 sunglasses?!?!) and 2.)there is always the risk they'll find out they've been had, which will just send them into depression, reversing any good effects it's had.

Better to get your feelings of well being from things that are authentically beneficial: good nutrition, exercise, all that stuff.
 
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  • #12
Evo
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turbo-1 said:
You need to hook up with an actual man.
I've tried but they keep escaping. :frown:
 
  • #13
Alkatran
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zoobyshoe said:
If so, what's the problem? If it works, why question it?
It's an ethical issue. If all you're selling is the placebo effect, why does it cost so much?
 
  • #14
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Alkatran said:
It's an ethical issue. If all you're selling is the placebo effect, why does it cost so much?
I thought that's what I said when I answered my own question:
zoobyshoe said:
If so, what's the problem? If it works, why question it? 1.) So long as people aren't aware this is what's going on it leaves them vulnerable to being financially exploited ($300.00 sunglasses?!?!) and 2.)there is always the risk they'll find out they've been had, which will just send them into depression, reversing any good effects it's had.
 
  • #15
chroot
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My father owns and operates one of the last independent pharmacies in Charlotte, NC. He's firmly an "above board" kind of gentleman, but recently has had scores of pain-management customers asking (pleading?) to sell them such wrist-magnets. Apparently some of the magnet companies will only sell through retailers, because they want to propagate an image of reputability.

My father told them time and time again that the magnets couldn't possibly do anything, and he couldn't bring himself to profit from selling them some item which he believed could not help them at all.

They eventually put enough pressure on him that he decided to begin selling the magnets despite himself -- at his own cost. He patiently explains to each and every customer who requests the magnets that, in his professional opinion, they're nothing but quackery, and that the company which makes them is robbing them. (And pharmacists are consistently the number one most trusted profession in the country!) They listen, nod, and clear out his inventory within a day or two of each shipment.

- Warren
 
  • #16
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chroot said:
He patiently explains to each and every customer who requests the magnets that, in his professional opinion, they're nothing but quackery, and that the company which makes them is robbing them. (And pharmacists are consistently the number one most trusted profession in the country!) They listen, nod, and clear out his inventory within a day or two of each shipment.
On the surface this is inexplicable and I think it would be well worth it for someone to dig into what's going on there - track these customers down and find out why they're buying these things despite their pharmacist's explicit advice against it, and warnings that they're being had.
 
  • #17
Alkatran
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That would be because belief that magnets work goes hand in hand with the idea that "big pharma" is covering up the fact that magnets work. To them, the deluded pharmacist is clearly just spouting off the massive's corporation smear campaign.
 
  • #18
chroot
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zoobyshoe said:
On the surface this is inexplicable and I think it would be well worth it for someone to dig into what's going on there - track these customers down and find out why they're buying these things despite their pharmacist's explicit advice against it, and warnings that they're being had.
It's probably because they're suffering from debilitating pain that is not responding well to traditional (pharmaceutical) treatment, so they're willing to toss $50 into ANYTHING that might provide some relief, imagined or otherwise.

It's sad to see, but I suppose they've only got $50 to lose, and everything to gain.

- Warren
 
  • #19
chroot
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Alkatran said:
That would be because belief that magnets work goes hand in hand with the idea that "big pharma" is covering up the fact that magnets work. To them, the deluded pharmacist is clearly just spouting off the massive's corporation smear campaign.
Yeah, er, or that.

- Warren
 
  • #20
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Alkatran said:
That would be because belief that magnets work goes hand in hand with the idea that "big pharma" is covering up the fact that magnets work. To them, the deluded pharmacist is clearly just spouting off the massive's corporation smear campaign.
chroot said:
It's probably because they're suffering from debilitating pain that is not responding well to traditional (pharmaceutical) treatment, so they're willing to toss $50 into ANYTHING that might provide some relief, imagined or otherwise.

It's sad to see, but I suppose they've only got $50 to lose, and everything to gain.
Yeah, between these two reasons you guys have probably hit the nail on the head.

Starting from scratch, with no knowledge of physics, the average person would have a difficult time uncovering the fact that a static magnetic field has no appreciable effect on the human body. Magnets seem inherently magic if you sit and play with them; easy to leverage into snake oil.
 
  • #21
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I bought a $90 pair of sunglasses once. My reasoning is the same as why I once bought a $40 pen. If i have something cheap (pens/sunglasses) I care little about them and dont treat them carefully. I'd sit on the glasses, drop them, throw them around and they wouldnt last very long. I bought a $90 pair of sunglasses and it took a year and a half before they got their first scratch, and only now, 3 years later are they starting to have structural problems from being bent. Id put them in their case in my car instead of throwing them on the seat next to me and such...

I guess if you pay more for it, youll treat it more respectably. That was my reason. (oh and same goes for Watches)

$300 is still a bit high though.
 
  • #22
chroot
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I paid almost $400 (total) for a pair of prescription wrap-around lenses in an absolutely excellent Ray-Ban frame. They were perfect -- the ideal glasses for aviation, driving, cycling, you name it. I loved them. I wore them for almost three years, until eventually someone stole them out of my car. :frown: I bet they were pissed to discover that only I could even use them.

- Warren
 
  • #23
Alkatran
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zoobyshoe said:
Yeah, between these two reasons you guys have probably hit the nail on the head.

Starting from scratch, with no knowledge of physics, the average person would have a difficult time uncovering the fact that a static magnetic field has no appreciable effect on the human body. Magnets seem inherently magic if you sit and play with them; easy to leverage into snake oil.
Let's suppose that the small magnetic field does work. Oh no! The number of MRI deaths just went to 100% of people who get one!
 
  • #24
SGT
If these guys can ionize a solid, they are serious candidates to a Nobel Prize.
 
  • #25
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http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/PhonyAds/qray.html
Consumer Protection Actions

In 2000, the Consumer Justice Center sued QT, Inc., and its owners for false advertising [5]. The suit was settled with a nondisclosure agreement. I provided an expert declaration in the case but do not know the settlement terms. However, it is safe to assume that the settlement agreement included payment and a pledge to stop making most of the claims that the suit challenged. A class-action suit is pending [6], and a false advertising suit is pending against the marketers of a similar device called the Balance Bracelet [7].

In June 2003, the FTC charged QT, Inc, Q-Ray Company, Bio-Metal, Inc., and their principals, Que Te (Andrew) Park and Jung Joo Park, with false advertising, and the federal district court in Chicago issued a temporary restraining order freezing their assets and prohibiting further use of misleading claims [8].

In May 2004, the FTC filed a similar suit against Balance Bracelet marketers Media Maverick, Inc., of San Luis Obispo, California, and its officers Mark Jones and Charles Cody [9]. Among other things, the company's Web site had claimed:

The Balance Bracelet is designed to aid the body in helping itself through electro-polarization. This helps the body return to its normal ionic balance. The Balance Bracelet acts on the body absorbing the static electricity that causes changes in different parts of the body.

In September 2006, the Chicago court sided with the FTC and ordered Que Te Park and his companies to turn over $22.5 million in net profits and provide up to $64.5 million more in refunds to consumers who had bought the bracelets [11]. During the trial, Park testified that he could not define the term "ionization" but picked it because it was simple and easy to remember. The court concluded that his testimony on ionization was "contradictory and full of obfuscation" and that "he is a clever marketer but a poor witness." Park also acknowledged that QT had at least a 25% refund rate from dissatisfied customers (more than 100,000 people) [12]. The FTC has set up a hotline number, 202-326-2063, for consumers with questions about the court’s opinion and order.
When you see the Q-Ray commercials now, they don't directly claim that it has specific benefits, only that purchasers report benefits, and they show a bunch of vaguely-worded testimonials. If the purchaser is indeed "benefiting" from a placebo effect, you cannot challenge the sellers on it. Very sneaky.

In the late '60s, early '70s (IIRC) it was copper bracelets that became a fad, with supposed health benefits. That in turn was a recycling of an even older folk belief in using copper bracelets to combat arthritis. One of my uncles used to wear his 24/7.
 

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