IR in a Nanotube: Can It Enter?

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In summary: This is an interesting idea, but I'm not sure how it would work.I found this on the internet "In this work, we further develop this idea by shaping the wavefront of the infrared light (at a wavelength of 1064 nm) passing through a 180-nm-radius hole that is surrounded by well-designed groove patterns into predesignated complex patterns such as Latin letters"
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Bruce Haawkins
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Can a medium range infrared photon enter a nonotube
 
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A typical nanotube has a diameter much smaller than the wavelength of visible or infrared light, so I don't think that there can be a situation that can be described as such a photon being confined inside the tube. Anyone correct me if I'm wrong.
 
  • #3
What about a gutar the sound wave is much larger than the diameter of the hole in the sound box yet the air particles are smaller. Is it not the same for a photon
 
  • #4
I found this on the internet "In this work, we further develop this idea by shaping the wavefront of the infrared light (at a wavelength of 1064 nm) passing through a 180-nm-radius hole that is surrounded by well-designed groove patterns into predesignated complex patterns such as Latin letters"
 
  • #5
See:
https://www.nature.com/articles/nphoton.2015.123
In the near field, plasmons in CNTs can be excited by infrared light (excitation wavelength 6-10μm). I don't know if this counts. Photonics isn't really my area.
Bruce Haawkins said:
I found this on the internet "In this work, we further develop this idea by shaping the wavefront of the infrared light (at a wavelength of 1064 nm) passing through a 180-nm-radius hole that is surrounded by well-designed groove patterns into predesignated complex patterns such as Latin letters"
Where on the internet did you find this?
 
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Does a photon even have a position observable in the way how an electron has one? It's possible to create an electron wavepacket that is localized inside some boundaries, but that kind of a wavepacket can't have a single de Broglie wavelength. With the quanta of the electromagnetic field, the situation is even more difficult.
 
  • #7
hilbert2 said:
Does a photon even have a position observable in the way how an electron has one?
No, but I think the quote in post 4 is treating light (semi-)classically. Without a reference, I can't say for sure, but I do know that light does funky things in the near field limit.
 
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I was thinking as the sound wave gets destorted as it moves thru the hole in the gutar, mabe the electromagintic field of the photon gets simalarly destorted
 

Related to IR in a Nanotube: Can It Enter?

1. What is an IR in a nanotube?

An IR (infrared) in a nanotube refers to the interaction between infrared light and a carbon nanotube. This interaction can result in changes in the properties and behavior of the nanotube, making it an important topic of study in nanoscience.

2. How does an IR enter a nanotube?

An IR can enter a nanotube through a process called resonant light scattering, where the wavelength of the infrared light matches the size and shape of the nanotube. This allows the light to interact strongly with the nanotube, potentially entering and affecting its properties.

3. What are the potential applications of IR in nanotubes?

The potential applications of IR in nanotubes are wide-ranging and include the development of new nanosensors, nanoelectronics, and nanophotonic devices. Additionally, understanding how IR interacts with nanotubes can lead to advancements in materials science, chemistry, and biomedicine.

4. How does the size and shape of a nanotube affect IR interaction?

The size and shape of a nanotube can significantly affect its interaction with infrared light. Smaller nanotubes tend to have higher resonant frequencies, meaning they interact more strongly with shorter wavelength infrared light. Similarly, the shape of the nanotube can also influence the types of IR interactions that occur.

5. Are there any challenges in studying IR in nanotubes?

Yes, there are several challenges in studying IR in nanotubes. One challenge is accurately measuring and controlling the size and shape of the nanotubes, as this can greatly impact their interactions with IR. Additionally, the small size of nanotubes makes it difficult to observe and measure their behavior, and specialized equipment is often needed to study IR interactions at the nanoscale.

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