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I IR in a nanotube

  1. Aug 9, 2018 #1
    Can a medium range infrared photon enter a nonotube
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 9, 2018 #2

    hilbert2

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    A typical nanotube has a diameter much smaller than the wavelength of visible or infrared light, so I don't think that there can be a situation that can be described as such a photon being confined inside the tube. Anyone correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2018 #3
    What about a gutar the sound wave is much larger than the diameter of the hole in the sound box yet the air particles are smaller. Is it not the same for a photon
     
  5. Aug 9, 2018 #4
    I found this on the internet "In this work, we further develop this idea by shaping the wavefront of the infrared light (at a wavelength of 1064 nm) passing through a 180-nm-radius hole that is surrounded by well-designed groove patterns into predesignated complex patterns such as Latin letters"
     
  6. Aug 9, 2018 #5

    TeethWhitener

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    See:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/nphoton.2015.123
    In the near field, plasmons in CNTs can be excited by infrared light (excitation wavelength 6-10μm). I don't know if this counts. Photonics isn't really my area.
    Where on the internet did you find this?
     
  7. Aug 9, 2018 #6

    hilbert2

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    Does a photon even have a position observable in the way how an electron has one? It's possible to create an electron wavepacket that is localized inside some boundaries, but that kind of a wavepacket can't have a single de Broglie wavelength. With the quanta of the electromagnetic field, the situation is even more difficult.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2018 #7

    TeethWhitener

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    No, but I think the quote in post 4 is treating light (semi-)classically. Without a reference, I can't say for sure, but I do know that light does funky things in the near field limit.
     
  9. Aug 9, 2018 #8
  10. Aug 9, 2018 #9
    I was thinking as the sound wave gets destorted as it moves thru the hole in the gutar, mabe the electromagintic field of the photon gets simalarly destorted
     
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