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Is 1K equal to 1C

  1. Oct 17, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    All we know think that 1C = 1K as difference. But our instructor said that they were not equal each other and wanted from us that we would prove this as homework. How can we prove that they were not equal each other?


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2007 #2
    K being Kelvin? And I don't exactly understand your question, do you need to prove that 1C is not equal to 1Kelvin? Because its not. 1C = 274.15Kelvin
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2007
  4. Oct 17, 2007 #3
    well 1 degree Celsius is equal to 274 Kelvin. the values of each degree are the same though, so I'm not sure what he means by prove it. perhaps you could list the temperature of absolute zero in kelvin and Celsius, then do the same for the freezing and boiling points of water...
     
  5. Oct 17, 2007 #4
    thats the measure for 0 Celsius in Kelvin
     
  6. Oct 17, 2007 #5
    Thats true, my bad.
     
  7. Oct 17, 2007 #6
    Sorry for misunderstanding. Instructor wrote on the blackboard as this:

    Is 1K (Kelvin) difference equal or not equal to 1C (celcius) difference?

    Everybody said that yes they are equal to each other but our instructor said that no they are not equal to each other and wanted from us to prove this as homework.

    I have a MSc degree and attending PHd. classes, this is the first time i have ever heard about this.
     
  8. Oct 17, 2007 #7

    Kurdt

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    I could only imagine your instructor was referring to how celsius and Kelvin scales were defined. The Kelvin scale was defined by absolute zero and the triple point of water. The celsius scale was defined by the melting point of ice and the boiling point of water. Many years ago they changed the definition of the celsius scale so that it too was defined by the absolute zero and the triple point of water. That means that the increments of 1K and 1 celsius are effectively defined to be the same.
     
  9. Oct 18, 2007 #8
    Thanks for your reply. Maybe it can be related with whether it is celcius or centigrade but it sounds strange when it is heard as they are not equal each other.

    Is there anyone who have strange or different opinion?

    Or, i mean, what will I write in my homework :)
     
  10. Oct 18, 2007 #9
    read Kurdt's post (last sentence if anything)
     
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