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B Is dark matter fifth force

  1. Aug 16, 2016 #1

    wolram

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    At last a theory of Dark matter that can be tested, is there a fundamental reason why this theory may be true?

    Recent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according to a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters by theoretical physicists at the University of California, IrvineRecent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according to a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters by theoretical physicists at the University of California, IrvineRecent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according to a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters by theoretical physicists at the University of California, IrvineRecent findings indicating the possible discovery of a previously unknown subatomic particle may be evidence of a fifth fundamental force of nature, according to a paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters by theoretical physicists at the University of California, Irvine
     
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  3. Aug 16, 2016 #2

    Chronos

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    Impossible to judge without a paper reference.
     
  4. Aug 16, 2016 #3
    The reference is to a paper by Feng, et al, offering an explanation for the 16MeV boson "discovered" by the Hungarian group. The paper, Protophobic Fifth-Force Interpretation of the Observed Anomaly in Be8 Nuclear Transitions, was published in last week's PRL and is on the arXiv.
    [/PLAIN] [Broken]
    They also have a follow-up paper, Particle Physics Models for the 17 MeV Anomaly in Beryllium Nuclear Decays, also on the arXiv.[/PLAIN] [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  5. Aug 16, 2016 #4

    wolram

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  6. Aug 16, 2016 #5

    Chalnoth

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    Interesting. It looks like this paper mostly looks at a single experimental result. If this idea turns out to also explain multiple additional discrepancies with regard to the standard model (such as the anomalous proton radius from muonic hydrogen measurements), then they might be on to something.

    I'm not sure that this model can explain dark matter, however, as the proposed particle decays rapidly. It seems that the only connection this proposal has with dark matter is that it's a proposed new particle beyond the standard model, just as dark matter typically is.
     
  7. Aug 16, 2016 #6

    Chronos

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    The hunt continues. A couple of other recent entries of interest include http://arxiv.org/abs/1608.03691, Dark Side of the Standard Model: Dormant New Physics Awaken and http://arxiv.org/abs/1608.04056, Interpretations of the possible 42.7 GeV γ-ray line. @wolram try to avoid news articles as references. The gold standard is publication in a peer reviewed journal. Arxiv is usually good providing the paper has at least been submitted to an acceptable journal.
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2016
  8. Aug 19, 2016 #7
    I was wondering where the discussion of this experiment was to be found. It's very interesting, and would seriously shake up the standard model. The reason that I'm hesitant though is it's mass. It's very low energy compared to say the Higgs boson. We've had the ability to create energies at the level required to create the particle since the 1950s, why are we just seeing it now?
     
  9. Aug 19, 2016 #8
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