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Is Iraq War a justice war?

  1. Sep 2, 2005 #1
    Is Iraq War a justice war?

    According to our Asian political views, America invaded Iraq has following bad intentions:

    1: Iraq is the world's second oil production contry, Bush wants to control Iraq's oil source to keep the economic of US.

    2: USA wants to press Iran and Syria, and control the East Asia.

    3: Bush wants to fame in history, so he used the pretext of terrorists to gain the fame. As Asian knows, Bush is a very cunning president, saying lies never feels shame, he made lies to deceive world's people for beginning wars.

    To give Iraq a democratic gov is only Bush a pretext, robbing Iraq's oil source is just the right reason.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 2, 2005 #2

    Lisa!

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    Somehow I'm happy Iraqis got rid of Saddam, but I'm not sure if their situation would be better now. Anyway it was an unfair war and Bush had no right to attack Iraq.

    PS I totally agree with your reasons.
     
  4. Sep 2, 2005 #3
    Interesting to hear about how the rest of the world views Bush. Does Asia think that America and Bush are the same? Or do they realize that Bush is acting on behalf of himself, his family, America's wealthy class and business people only?
     
  5. Sep 2, 2005 #4

    Lisa!

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    Only Asia?
     
  6. Sep 2, 2005 #5
    Unfortunately, now that he has been reelected, the rest of the world is probably less inclined to disassociate him from the rest of Americans.
     
  7. Sep 2, 2005 #6
    It takes a great deal of sophisticated analysis to understand that what is in the interests of the wealthy is very often against the interests of ordinary people. Even highly educated people do not always see this.

    Was 'the war in Iraq' in the interests of 'the American people'? Was it in their interests to finance such a huge military operation with both funds that could have been spent better in other areas and with soldiers' lives? Of course not. But do all ordinary US citizens understand this? I don't think so. It was certainly in the interests of: armament manufacturers, construction companies, etc, etc. that the US citizens finance this war and thus open up new 'markets' and subsidise the profits these companies would otherwise not have made.

    If even US citizens don't understand this, I don't see that there is a great chance that people living elsewhere will. My guess is that most people would judge that 'Americans' are to blame. They are wrong - but nevertheless, this is probably what they would think.
     
  8. Sep 2, 2005 #7

    vanesch

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    I still claim, that no matter what was the real agenda for Iraq, it failed.
     
  9. Sep 2, 2005 #8
    here are bill blum's (www.killinghope.org) reasons:

     
  10. Sep 2, 2005 #9
    Ah, vanesch - it is certainly looking shakey at the moment. It does seem to have failed (or at least, it was not easily achieved - has not yet been achieved). The problem is, when you start taking such gambles (as the US administration has done), you have to be aware that the gamble may not pay off. So, I would agree with you that the US admin's play has not yielded the expected/required results. And you may even be correct that they *have* lost (though the evidence is yet incomplete - the scenario has not yet been fully played out; it is, however, playing itself out right now as more and more US taxes are poured onto the gambling table). Let's see, heh? You're probably right, but the game hasn't ended yet...
     
  11. Sep 2, 2005 #10

    DM

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    In order to ratify this statement and ideology, The Bush administration should've held a national referendum. The same applies for Britain, the majority of citizens did not wish to go to war but not having the choice to vote meant that Tony Blair would use our name in the 'War on terror'.
     
  12. Sep 2, 2005 #11

    vanesch

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    Yes, we now see how Iran is shivering before Almighty US Army :smile:

    Uh, still too early, but I don't hear them sing yet :smile:

    Well, Europe took itself down all by itself, didn't need the US for that :blushing:, and yeah, the oil is flowing, the price in $ is plummeting :rofl:

    As long as it respects the Sharia, there will be no problem :smile:

    Until the Chinese will stop buying T-bills :rofl:

    Hope it is made of VERY THICK armourplate... and I wouldn't want to drink the water !
    :devil:
     
  13. Sep 2, 2005 #12
    The same thing happened in Australia, DM. Mass demonstrations were organised against the invasion, and really (because of the seriousness of this decision), it should have gone to a national referendum - but no... 'we' 'elected' (God) John Howard and 'gods' do as they please, don't they? I certainly don't agree with Australia's involvement in this mess - but then again, I wasn't given a chance to air my views, was I? And *this* is what we so proudly call "democracy". Ha!
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2005
  14. Sep 2, 2005 #13

    DM

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    Yes, indeed.
     
  15. Sep 2, 2005 #14
    In Asian view, the Iraq War reflects the American essence, they think American essence is bad and arbitrary. Now also Europe abandons America, USA has not many friends, some "friends" are only pretended.
     
  16. Sep 2, 2005 #15
    Also the European...
     
  17. Sep 2, 2005 #16
    Also here in South america
     
  18. Sep 3, 2005 #17
    You know, just due to the discussions on these boards and knowing human nature... I think this IS the essence of America... It's hard enough to convince individuals who are supposed to be thinkers... without a doubt, most of the the non-thinkers actually accept the stories we see on television. So the world does have a right in believing that Bush represents America as he certainly does. It important, though, to point out that NOT all American's share his sentiments. It is a great shame and irony that this so called FREE system does not fully permit for a means to oppose his actions. We are free to talk to deaf ears.
     
  19. Sep 3, 2005 #18
    Please don't lose sight of the fact that half of the vote went to Kerry, and kerry supporters were almost all very passionate in their dislike for bush.

    In that sense, he doesn't represent America, only half of it. And many of them voted for him passionately, for a single reason such as his stand on abortion, or his tax philosophy, or his "straight shooter" stance. The war was very much ignored by the Bushies during campaigning. (This is my recollection and opinion, I don't have a source handy to reference this.) Domestic issues were given for why they supported him (read: Tax breaks) making the response to Katrina even more ironic.
     
  20. Sep 4, 2005 #19

    vanesch

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    I would like to say that one shouldn't be too harsh on the US (administration and people) either ; it is just as wrong. I even give Bush the benefit of doubt that he *really* wanted to do something good. After all, I think in world history, the US has been the most "benign" superpower that has ever been ; most great empires in the past where MUCH MORE agressive. I think that Bush's philosophy must have been "what's good for the US is good for the world" and in a way, this would have been true if it were an enlightened view.
    The Iraq war was probably based upon a "hidden agenda" which had something "good" (in the above view) to it: ousting a dictator, removing threats, install a US-friendly democracy, etc... were seen to be good for the US AND good for the world ; ok and some stuff was especially good for the US and Cheney's buddies but that was the cherry on top of the cake.
    The problem is that these people had in their book also that lying and cheating for the greater good was a perfectly acceptable thing to do, hence the stories about WMD, links to 9/11 etc... And getting angry at the rest of the weasly world for not taking up the courageous stance that would improve life for everybody.
    The problem is that they screwed up dearly (and in fact ran into a trap that was set up for them by OBL!). And by the same book that allowed for cheating and lying in the first place, you also never admit you were wrong.
    In doing so he brought more damage to the US (and slightly more to the rest of the world) than he ever intended. But once this crew will be gone, and the US will have gone through a kind of purgatory, things will improve.
     
  21. Sep 4, 2005 #20
    i don't think the bush admn deserve your benefiy of the doubt... as you said.. there was a hidden agenda, and he is more preoccupied with his agenda than helping the poor... i believe the statistics say that louisiana has the highest concentration of poor blacks... they do not support bush,so that may be an explanation for the lack of priority... there should have been a reaction from the feds at latest by day 2... it was all over the news... whats with the hold up? anyhow, remember that colin powell left the team... what's the reason for that?
     
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