Is it natural to be scared?

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  • #26
reenmachine
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It looks like Scutigera coleoptrata, a variant of the house centipede. They eat lots of other insects and they pose no threats to humans so they can be good companions as long as you don't handle them too much.
Yeah , that's what everybody that knows them tell me , but I still turn into a predator when I see one.I know what it's like to try to kill it and miss it and then not finding it in my bedroom.Try to sleep after that.I'm not very afraid of bugs in general but these ones are disgusting.I'm always scared one comes on my face while I'm sleeping or worst , one comes on my face and I wake up at that moment. :yuck:
 
  • #27
WannabeNewton
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I'm surprised you never saw one in NY.
I've seen a centipede once last summer but never anything that monstrous. I couldn't sleep the whole night knowing it was there.
 
  • #28
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I'm thankful in live in the United Kingdom where the biggest bug we get in our house is either a moth or a spider, both about an inch in diametre
 
  • #29
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That picture is... frightening. I don't like spiders, but now I know what true horror looks like :eek:. That creature looks very fast, like a Ferrari bug.
 
  • #30
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Ever had one of these bad boys in your room? I've had a couple of them over the years , they are very fast and disgusting.If you miss it with your first shot , it's gone.Thankfully they are loners.

House_centipede.jpg
These are extremely common in the North East, I used to encounter dozens of them a year in my old place, now I see maybe 5-6 a year in my place.

I once put on a pair of pants which had been laying on the floor and had an unexpected guess inside them. Another time of these ran across my foot and up my leg on the outside of my pants. I find the easiest way to kill them is to capture them with a large cup/bowl, then invert it with a paper slid between it and the wall and just flush them down the drain with scalding hot water.
 
  • #31
reenmachine
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These are extremely common in the North East, I used to encounter dozens of them a year in my old place, now I see maybe 5-6 a year in my place.

I once put on a pair of pants which had been laying on the floor and had an unexpected guess inside them. Another time of these ran across my foot and up my leg on the outside of my pants. I find the easiest way to kill them is to capture them with a large cup/bowl, then invert it with a paper slid between it and the wall and just flush them down the drain with scalding hot water.
Yes , I live in the north east , that's why I was surprised that WBN never had any.The picture is a perfect replica of the ones at my place.

When I leave clothes on the floor it's possible there will be one inside.It happened to me too one time , so now I always verify.

The cup/bowl trick is good , but not the best since they tend to stay close to the wall and the floor in the corner when they escape your attack.It's hard to capture it with a bowl when they are there.At the beginning I used to do like I did with spiders , take the time to get a book and kill them with it.But now I understand that centipedes will see right through you and just escape while you're looking for a "weapon".:rofl:

Now I immediately try to kill it with my feet or hand.No time to lose.It's disgusting yes , but less disgusting than knowing this thing escaped and is hanging out in your bedroom
 
  • #32
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I don't squish them because they leave their guts and twitching legs all over the place when you do, so I try to catch them intact and dispose in a less gory manner.
 
  • #33
davenn
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The last thing that put any significant fear into me was in Aug 2012 when I was lying in a hospital bed fighting for life prior to open heart surgery.
It was scary not knowing if I was going to make it through
I have been worried about a lot of thinks throughout life, but this was really the first time that my life was really on the line and thinking.. God, get me through this hell, else I'm looking at death.

Dave
 
  • #34
ZombieFeynman
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If you learn the math and understand the physics rigorously, the physics will be a lot less mysterious. The main reason it seems so mysterious is because popular physics (e.g. Through the Wormhole) depicts it that way by hiding the math and littering the physics with hyperbole. That's not to say the physics isn't counter-intuitive but at least you'll be able to understand it formally.
I disagree with this completely and utterly.

There are many things that are completely mysterious to me in a way; I don't understand them. It doesn't mean I can't calculate using them, or that I don't accept them. But there are certain things that are incomprehensible to me.

I would say that I have learned what physics and math I know rigorously.

[EDIT]: The overall trend has been that the more I know about nature, the more I am awed, overwhelmed, and mystified by it.
 
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  • #35
reenmachine
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Look at this WBN , this is what I'm talking about.Take note that this one is probably as big as the biggest I've seen in my life so most are a little bit smaller but not that much (the one in the video seems particularly long):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S7X_pckD67s
 
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  • #36
reenmachine
Gold Member
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The last thing that put any significant fear into me was in Aug 2012 when I was lying in a hospital bed fighting for life prior to open heart surgery.
It was scary not knowing if I was going to make it through
I have been worried about a lot of thinks throughout life, but this was really the first time that my life was really on the line and thinking.. God, get me through this hell, else I'm looking at death.

Dave
Very touching story Dave.It puts a lot of things into perspective.
 
  • #37
MarneMath
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPdecxLF0O8

Waking up with one of those things inside your boot. Scariest 2 minutes of my life.
 
  • #38
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davenn said:
The last thing that put any significant fear into me was in Aug 2012 when I was lying in a hospital bed fighting for life prior to open heart surgery.
It was scary not knowing if I was going to make it through
I have been worried about a lot of thinks throughout life, but this was really the first time that my life was really on the line and thinking.. God, get me through this hell, else I'm looking at death.

Dave
Good to hear you made it through
 
  • #39
WannabeNewton
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Look at this WBN , this is what I'm talking about.Take note that this one is probably as big as the biggest I've seen in my life so most are a little bit smaller but not that much (the one in the video seems particularly long):
Yep thanks for that. Now I won't be able to freaking sleep all night (not that I sleep anyways xP).
 
  • #40
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Yes, it is natural to be scared. But, I don't think that you can be scared while reading math or physics. I was scared of ghosts, super-natural elements, etc.... But after reading a little bit of physics, I am convinced that no such thing exits. I was scared of cockroaches and considered them to be yucky, disgusting creatures. After reading chemistry, I have understood that the whole of cockroach is built by organic material. Though Iam scared of cockroaches even today, I say to myself that "They are made of organic material, why worry?" so that I need not worry about the disgust or dirtiness of the cockroaches..
 
  • #41
Evo
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They are made of organic material, why worry?" so that I need not worry about the disgust or dirtiness of the cockroaches..
Actually, an exterminator was explaining that it's because roaches are so clean that they are easy to kill because they are constantly cleaning themselves and ingesting residual poison (I guess he considers roach spit to be clean). He said that is why spraying is not very successful for spiders because they don't clean themselves like roaches therefor do not accidentally consume the poison.

OMG, he was right. I still think they are gross.

http://health.ninemsn.com/whatsgoodforyou/theshow/694458/are-cockroaches-as-dirty-as-we-all-believe
 
  • #42
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Any chance we can take it back to the OT :P
 
  • #43
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See how the original topic changes :-)
well i hate them soooo much !!!!!!
And don't want them in my house :-)
 
  • #44
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Actually, an exterminator was explaining that it's because roaches are so clean that they are easy to kill because they are constantly cleaning themselves and ingesting residual poison (I guess he considers roach spit to be clean). He said that is why spraying is not very successful for spiders because they don't clean themselves like roaches therefor do not accidentally consume the poison.

OMG, he was right. I still think they are gross.

http://health.ninemsn.com/whatsgoodforyou/theshow/694458/are-cockroaches-as-dirty-as-we-all-believe
Well, since we're discussing scary things discovered in the universe, aren't we still OT? ;)

And as for "clean" roaches, in New Orleans we have these giant, flying cockroaches (Florida has them too, but they call them "palmetto bugs," clearly Florida has a better PR firm.) They live in oak trees and you can't keep them out of your house. I found one in my bathtub once, so I got a hot water stream running from the shower and then aimed it at the sucker. I discovered that he basically exploded a dark residue into the water draining off him. He did not seem very clean, nor did my bathtub, even after several Comet baths.

Also, when I was a little kid, I was looking for something in my attic. Later, my arm was very itchy. I kept scratching, and finally pulled up my sleeve, from which, yes, a giant flying cockroach scurried. My arm was all bitten up, too.

So, yes, the universe if full of scary discoveries, if you look hard enough ...
 
  • #45
Pythagorean
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so.. what latitude should I remain above to avoid ever seeing cockroaches?
 
  • #46
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so.. what latitude should I remain above to avoid ever seeing cockroaches?
It's probably the same latitude at which you begin to encounter the spiky centipede-things.
 
  • #47
Evo
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It's probably the same latitude at which you begin to encounter the spiky centipede-things.
:thumbs: There is no winning.
 
  • #48
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Oh, you people are going to be so sorry you got me started on cockroaches ...

My grandmother, born in 1914, had some weird habits, including, as I noticed when I was about 5, sleeping with cotton in her ears. I asked mom why she did this, to which she replied, "Grandma doesn't want roaches to crawl into her ears."

If ever an answer required elaboration, it was this one. "That can happen?!? Why??" I'm pretty sure I wasn't screaming.

"No, of course not. She's just being careful. You know how she is." And I did know, but still, being the budding scientist, I sought more data. At that young age, I was already aware of observer bias, and I had observed that mom thought grandma was crazy. I had developed my own hypothesis, viz; us kids were too damn loud. I had plenty of anecdotal evidence to support this.

"Grandma, why do you sleep with cotton in your ears?"

She looked at me as if to judge my ability to hear a hard truth. Then, "When I was a little girl, a roach crawled into my ear when I was asleep. I could hear it crawling around.:-) " She gave me a knowing look. "They do that to make you crazy. Finally the doctors had to pour poison into my ear to kill it."

I only tried to sleep with cotton in my ears for a few weeks, until I rationalized that she was, indeed, crazy-ish. It's really uncomfortable, and definitely a liability when trying to detect a little brother ambush.

Years later, after her death, I ran into my great uncle, and related the tale, expecting a chuckle or two. Uh, no. Very seriously, he explained her behavior.

When grandma was 8 or 9, a cockroach had indeed crawled into her ear. And, indeed, it had made her a bit crazy. Finally, a doctor making a house call (look that up on Wikipedia, kids,) poured mineral oil into her ear, either: a) flushing it out, or b) killing it in situ.

That uncertainty made me a bit crazy for awhile, too, also.

So, to get back OT, uh, I guess I'm saying, be careful about what questions you ask?
 
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  • #49
lisab
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so.. what latitude should I remain above to avoid ever seeing cockroaches?
Can't say that I've ever seen one here in the Seattle area.
 
  • #50
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I think that cockroaches cant surivive in arctic and antarctic conditions.
 

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