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Is it possible: Supernova Bomb

  1. Oct 3, 2010 #1
    Here, tell me if this will work. A chamber made of thick lead is taken and a vaccum is put on it. There are electromagnets between the lead. A ball of unstable uranium and osmium that is plated with iron is put in the chamber and suspended by the magnets. Then protons and neutrons are injected into the chamber. For the bomb to go off the electricity in the magnets will spike tremedously. The protons will squeeze the ball to the density of a neutron star for a split second. Then the neutrons who have a weaker magnetic field will be delayed and come in after the protons. The neutrons will then split the uranium atom in a HUGE explosion. So, will it work?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 3, 2010 #2
    It will work if you use about 10 solar masses. :)

    Otherwise I think the proposed method will fall short of producing the needed pressure by MANY orders of magnitude, and the energy required will be larger than you can get from fissioning the uranium.
     
  4. Oct 3, 2010 #3
    but would it make a bigger blast than normal?
     
  5. Oct 3, 2010 #4

    phyzguy

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    Try calculating the energy necessary to compress a macroscopic ball of matter (say 10 kg) to nuclear density.
     
  6. Oct 3, 2010 #5
     
  7. Oct 3, 2010 #6

    DaveC426913

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    Is there something about the current hydrogen bomb that you think doesn't cut it?

    Forget magnets, a hydrogen bomb compresses its core by exploding several atom bombs around it.
     
  8. Oct 3, 2010 #7

    Danger

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    :confused: :bugeye:
     
  9. Oct 3, 2010 #8

    MATLABdude

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  10. Oct 4, 2010 #9
    "Try calculating the energy necessary to compress a macroscopic ball of matter (say 10 kg) to nuclear density."

    What do you mean? And how would i do that?
     
  11. Oct 4, 2010 #10

    Danger

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    Yeah, I'm familiar with the concept. It was the "several atom bombs around it" part that threw me off. That particular phrasing suggests something quite different (to me, at least).
     
  12. Oct 26, 2010 #11
    lol, I know from personal experience a "nova bomb" would be possible to make. I must say, however, that your ideas of the design are a bit off ;)

    P.S. Long Live Liberty
     
  13. Oct 26, 2010 #12

    DaveC426913

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    Yah. Atomic Physicists often lol. :rolleyes:
     
  14. Oct 26, 2010 #13
    lol, i'm no atomic physicist, I just know people involved in the making of such a device within the U.S. Gov. - thats why I said long live liberty, but you guys wouldn't know why I say that ;)
     
  15. Oct 26, 2010 #14

    DaveC426913

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    How mysterious of you.
     
  16. Oct 26, 2010 #15
    Is it?

    P.S."Doesn't it hurt when you think, THEN STOP DOING IT!" (quote from someone I know ((not a movie or book title I mean somebody that I know)
     
  17. Oct 27, 2010 #16
    Allright lets get back on topic. Elijah, you said that you know its possible but my design is off a bit. Can tell me whats wrong with it and help me fix it? Help me out here, you know what your talking about.
     
  18. Oct 28, 2010 #17

    Danger

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    With no particular offense intended, there is nothing that says "loss of liberty" more than having the Yank military in charge of any kind of arsenal. It might work for your population, but to the rest of the world it's just "bully" tactics.
     
  19. Oct 28, 2010 #18

    Pengwuino

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    His 1 other post on this forum shows he doesn't know the very basics of physics. I'd consider someone else for a source of information.
     
  20. Oct 28, 2010 #19

    QuantumPion

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    What the OP is describing sounds to me like a regular gun-type uranium fission bomb, but using electrostatics instead of gunpowder. I suppose if you had powerful enough magnets, this could result in a more efficient bomb, since you could accelerate the critical mass together faster than with chemical explosives. However I don't see how this has anything to do with supernovas?
     
  21. Oct 28, 2010 #20

    Danger

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    It has nothing to do with them. A supernova requires a star of at least 3.2 Solar masses to collapse under its own gravity.
    What the OP suggested seems to be a kindergarten explanation of a neutron bomb, aside from the actual operating principles—H-bomb with a standard A-bomb trigger, wrapped in a U-238 jacket which spits out prodigious amounts of neutrons when bombarded from within by the fusion output.
     
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