Is it safe to supercool something in my house

  • Thread starter Someone502
  • Start date
In summary, if you want to supercool something (keep it a liquid below freezing) in your house, it is safe as long as you are careful with the vibration from the refrigerator/freezer. You can do this by using a piece of foam padding, thin sponge, or a folded washcloth under the container.
  • #1
Someone502
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i don't know if this should go in physics but oh well.

First off, is it safe to supercool something in my house. Second, is it even possible. Third, how cold would i have to get it to supercool it?

Thanks.
 
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  • #2
What do you mean "super cool"?
 
  • #3
its when a liquid stays a liquid below freezing, but if it is disturbed even slightly it will freeze, very fast.
 
  • #4
Oh, i dunno
 
  • #5
Someone502 said:
First off, is it safe to supercool something in my house.
Depends on what the something is. It's safe with water, not so with Gallium (this has nothing to do with your house - but Gallium is toxic)
Second, is it even possible.
Under the right conditions : yes.
Third, how cold would i have to get it to supercool it?
Again, this depends on what the "it" is. You have to cool it just below its freezing point. (I'm essentially quoting you here.) Different "its" have different freezing points.
 
  • #6
Someone502 said:
i don't know if this should go in physics but oh well.

First off, is it safe to supercool something in my house. Second, is it even possible. Third, how cold would i have to get it to supercool it?

Thanks.

After a quick google search :

1. Yes
2. Yes.
3. Unshaken, distilled water in a very clean glass bottle stored in a freezer for a few hours : it should crystallize when removed and slightly shaken if all goes well.
 
  • #7
Gonzolo said:
3. Unshaken, distilled water in a very clean glass bottle stored in a freezer for a few hours : it should crystallize when removed and slightly shaken if all goes well.
NOTE : You want to make the freezer temperature be just (a couple degrees or so) below freezing. Too low and it won't work.

A piece of foam padding, a thin sponge, or even a folded washcloth under the container will help dampen vibrations from the compressor and floor.

The disturbance from opening the refrigerator/freezer door will usually be enough the cause crystallization. So, it will freeze up before you can see it...unless you're really, really careful.
 

Related to Is it safe to supercool something in my house

1. Is it safe to supercool something in my house?

Supercooling is generally safe to do in your house as long as you follow proper safety precautions. However, it is important to note that there are some risks involved, such as the potential for the container to shatter or for the liquid to freeze instantly upon contact with a surface.

2. What are the safety precautions I should take when supercooling something in my house?

When supercooling, it is important to wear protective gear, such as gloves and eye protection, to prevent any potential injuries. It is also recommended to supercool in a well-ventilated area and to use containers specifically designed for supercooling.

3. Can any liquid be supercooled in my house?

Not all liquids can be supercooled, as it depends on their chemical composition. Water, for example, can be supercooled, but other liquids such as alcohol or oil may not be able to reach a supercooled state.

4. How low of a temperature can I reach when supercooling something in my house?

The temperature that can be reached when supercooling something in your house will depend on the type of liquid and the conditions in which you are supercooling. However, it is generally not recommended to go below -9 degrees Celsius, as this is the freezing point of most household liquids.

5. Are there any risks involved in supercooling something in my house?

Yes, there are some risks involved in supercooling, such as the potential for the container to shatter or for the liquid to freeze instantly upon contact with a surface. It is important to take proper safety precautions and to be aware of the potential risks before attempting to supercool something in your house.

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