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Is it safe to supercool something in my house

  1. Apr 11, 2005 #1
    i dont know if this should go in physics but oh well.

    First off, is it safe to supercool something in my house. Second, is it even possible. Third, how cold would i have to get it to supercool it?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 11, 2005 #2

    Pengwuino

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    What do you mean "super cool"???
     
  4. Apr 11, 2005 #3
    its when a liquid stays a liquid below freezing, but if it is disturbed even slightly it will freeze, very fast.
     
  5. Apr 11, 2005 #4

    Pengwuino

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    Oh, i dunno
     
  6. Apr 11, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    Depends on what the something is. It's safe with water, not so with Gallium (this has nothing to do with your house - but Gallium is toxic)
    Under the right conditions : yes.
    Again, this depends on what the "it" is. You have to cool it just below its freezing point. (I'm essentially quoting you here.) Different "its" have different freezing points.
     
  7. Apr 11, 2005 #6
    After a quick google search :

    1. Yes
    2. Yes.
    3. Unshaken, distilled water in a very clean glass bottle stored in a freezer for a few hours : it should crystallize when removed and slightly shaken if all goes well.
     
  8. Apr 11, 2005 #7

    Gokul43201

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    NOTE : You want to make the freezer temperature be just (a couple degrees or so) below freezing. Too low and it won't work.

    A piece of foam padding, a thin sponge, or even a folded washcloth under the container will help dampen vibrations from the compressor and floor.

    The disturbance from opening the refrigerator/freezer door will usually be enough the cause crystallization. So, it will freeze up before you can see it...unless you're really, really careful.
     
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