Is light really discrete?

  • Thread starter pergradus
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  • #1
pergradus
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We never actually directly detect light, only its interaction with matter. Why do we have to consider this "wave particle duality" with light? Isn't it enough to say that light IS continuous, and it is the discrete nature of mater that gives rise to things like the photoelectric effect?

Is there any mathematical basis for believing that light is made of particles? The wave equations follow so beautifully from Maxwell's equations it seems like such a waste to just disregard that result. I feel like its a bit of a cop out to just say "its both a wave and a particle" when NO ONE can understand or believe that, rather than examining the limitations of quantum mechanics.
 

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  • #2
Vanadium 50
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You might want to start over with this thread. Just because you don't understand something does not mean that nobody understands it, or that it's a cop out.
 

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