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Is my country's biology low standard?

  1. Mar 2, 2005 #1
    Well, I am in secondary school. But now, I am just learning about bones, vertebrae, and all that, is that slow? Where can I get more information? :surprised
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 2, 2005 #2

    brewnog

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    Well it depends what you're actually learning (people at university learn about bones, and so do people at nursery). I suppose it also depends at what age you start secondary school, and by what you're comparing your country to.
     
  4. Mar 2, 2005 #3

    Moonbear

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    In addition to what brewnog mentioned, it also would depend on what else you've been learning about. One topic out of a biology curriculum isn't going to say much about what you'll be learning overall. There's quite a bit of flexibility about what order things are taught in biology, so you can't always compare what you're class is covering to what someone else is covering until you're completely done with the class.
     
  5. Mar 3, 2005 #4
    TIMMS data, 2003

    Your nation's 2003 TIMSS science attainment score might tell you something. Is your nation listed here?:
    http://nces.ed.gov/timss/TIMSS03Tables.asp?figure=6&Quest=3


    • Singapore 578
      Chinese Taipei 571
      South Korea 558
      Hong Kong 556
      Estonia 552
      Japan 552
      Hungary 543
      Netherlands 536
      United States 527
      Australia 527
      Sweden 524
      Slovenia 520
      New Zealand 520
      Lithuania 519
      Slovak Republic 517
      Belgium (Flemish) 516
      Russian Federation 514
      Latvia 512
      Scotland 512
      Malaysia 510
      Norway 494
      Italy 491
      Israel 488
      Bulgaria 479
      Jordan 475

      Average Score 473

      Moldova 472
      Romania 470
      Serbia 468
      Armenia 461
      Iran 453
      Macedonia 449
      Cyprus 441
      Bahrain 438
      Palestinian Authority 435
      Egypt 421
      Indonesia 420
      Chile 413
      Tunisia 404
      Saudi Arabia 398
      Morocco 396
      Lebanon 393
      Philippines 377
      Botswana 365
      Ghana 255
      South Africa 244
     
  6. Mar 3, 2005 #5

    Monique

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    That's interesting, these countries have better scores than the US?

    Singapore 578
    Chinese Taipei 571
    South Korea 558
    Hong Kong 556
    Estonia 552
    Japan 552
    Hungary 543
    Netherlands 536
     
  7. Mar 3, 2005 #6

    brewnog

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    All of those I can believe, Hungary is a surprise though...
     
  8. Mar 3, 2005 #7
    Monique, all of those countries have higher British-relative national IQs than does the U.S. (except possibly Estonia which I don't have IQ data for):
    http://www.childrenofmillennium.org/science.htm


    • Singapore 103
    • Chinese Taipei 100
    • South Korea 106
    • Hong Kong 107
    • Estonia ?
    • Japan 105
    • Hungary 99
    • Netherlands 102
    • United States 98
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2005
  9. Mar 3, 2005 #8

    selfAdjoint

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    Are you kidding? von Neumann, Erdos, many others?....
     
  10. Mar 3, 2005 #9
    Among children in Estonia, it's 99 for 7-11 year olds and 100.2 for 12-18 year olds. Sources: 1
    and 2 .

    - Kamataat
     
  11. Mar 3, 2005 #10

    brewnog

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    What, a couple of dead mathematicians are supposed to influence a country's teaching ability?
     
  12. Mar 3, 2005 #11
    Since Hungary only recently adopted a market economy, selfAdjoint, and its per-cap GDP-PPP is only $13,900, the high science-educational attainment being achieved by its 8th-graders might indeed reasonably be considered surprising.
     
  13. Mar 3, 2005 #12

    selfAdjoint

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    Hungarian mathematical brilliance

    They came from Hungary, and many others with them. When this clutch of Hungarian geniuses (not including Erdos) landed in the US during WWII, they were called "The Martians" because they were so eerily special. Now, these folks were all Jewish, so the Jewish Hungarian community is where to look, but during the 20th century before the nazis, there was considerable intermarriage as the smarter Jews moved out of their rural shtels and into the cities.

    The notion that student brilliance and achievement is a function of market capitalism is just ludicrous, when you look at the very statistics hitssquad exhibited. Why isn't the most market-intensive country in the world at the top of the list? When do you stop with special pleading and look at the actual forces in play?
     
  14. Mar 3, 2005 #13
    That's 98 and 100.2. The figure of 99 is the result of an averaging of the later (2003) 98 result and the earlier (2002) 100.2 result ("...and 99 based on the combined results for two studies;" from your first reference).

    Anyway, thank you for the data.
     
  15. Mar 3, 2005 #14
    Which of those countries has not adopted a market economy?



    And why doesn't SAT score predict grade-point average among Harvard students? The answer for both is, "That list is the top of the list, and there is more than one factor involved."
     
  16. Mar 3, 2005 #15
    i wonder why is India not on that list...

    didnt know Slovenia had citizens with such a high IQ...


    thanks for the data... interesting to see how the countries rank..
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2005
  17. Mar 4, 2005 #16

    brewnog

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    But what's all this got to do with teaching?
     
  18. Mar 4, 2005 #17
    Rolemodels and values, perhaps?

    Here in Finland we have this huge IT company, Nokia. Sure, they are pouring money into pure research, but non the less I'd say they also influence socially.
     
  19. Mar 4, 2005 #18
    how............?
     
  20. Mar 4, 2005 #19
    Well, in many ways, for example: by providing sources of aspiration for students, maybe special founds and chairs for researchers, a respect from the general population towards the field and maybe students therefore get more support from their parents, etc. All this may lead to more competition and better average results.
     
  21. Apr 2, 2005 #20
    well, mine is MAlaysia
    very low isn't it
     
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