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Is radioactivity decay reversible or irreversible?

  1. Dec 3, 2004 #1
    is radioactivity decay reversible or irreversible?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 3, 2004 #2
    The probability of the reverse effect is unbelievably small, such as with glass shreds becoming a window.
     
  4. Dec 3, 2004 #3
    Excellent analogy Gonzolo
     
  5. Dec 4, 2004 #4
    In a sense, yes. Nucei can be bombarded with alpha rays. The nuclei will then absorb some of the alpha particles and changes its Z number.

    Accelerators often to this to produce special material, E.g. a material with a large percentage of an isotope which nomally isn't there.

    Pete
     
  6. Dec 4, 2004 #5

    Clausius2

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    I think there is no real chemical or nuclear reaction espontaneously reversible.
     
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