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Is Rock-n-Roll dead?

  1. Apr 11, 2005 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    The funny thing about this question is that Rap, New-Age, Metal, or whatever, are all just variations of Rock to me. I consider Rock to be anything that my parents would not listen to. :biggrin: So this would include anything produced after about 1954.

    Still, tonight on the Lehrer News Hour, on PBS, Clarence Page [not Jimmy] did a story about the death Rock. Concert and other sales are down, and the new thing is called Urban. The story's review was mixed but it did make Rock sound like a thing of the past.

    Am I old? :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 11, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

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    Yes. :rofl:
     
  4. Apr 11, 2005 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    Hey, hey, my, my
    Rock and Roll will never die

    Now I think I'm gonna
    start to cry
    Hey, hey, my, my
     
  5. Apr 11, 2005 #4

    Moonbear

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    I wasn't answering the question about Rock 'n' Roll. :tongue:

    Rock 'n' Roll ain't gonna die!
     
  6. Apr 11, 2005 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    Now I know I'm gonna
    start to cry
    Hey, hey, my, my
     
  7. Apr 11, 2005 #6

    Moonbear

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    :redface: Sorry. :shy:
     
  8. Apr 11, 2005 #7
    Well, we are atleast a generation apart and I would agree with you. I don't think your age is the most important factor here. What kind of music did your parents listen to?

    Huck Mom
     
  9. Apr 11, 2005 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was joking a little bit but they were fans of the crooners, the Rat Pack et al, and even, gulp, Lawrence Welk; and even, gulp...gulp, polkas.
     
  10. Apr 11, 2005 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    What were we talking about...? Hi, my name is Ivan, and I'm old. :biggrin:
     
  11. Apr 11, 2005 #10

    Moonbear

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    Hey, I learned to dance to Lawrence Welk! Well, okay, I learned to stand on my grandfather's toes while he danced to Lawrence Welk. :biggrin: And I still like polkas! I don't know how to properly dance a polka, but they sure were fun to jump around to in my grandparents' basement.
     
  12. Apr 11, 2005 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    Now there's a law suit! :biggrin:

    Okay, I have to admit that as a kid, I liked polkas as well. But I don't think I have ever admitted this in public. :uhh:
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2005
  13. Apr 11, 2005 #12

    SOS2008

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    Dear Ivan,

    I must go my own way, but I hope you will remember the good times we had together,

    Rock N Roll

    There, there -- Rock is alive and well, just under new names such as alternative, etc. Rock use to be the blues, jazz, etc. It's just evolving, and sometimes it takes forms that don't last long (disco, punk) thank goodness, really. There WAS a generation gap with our parents (ooops, I'm old too! :cry: ) and the music they listened to. Our music WAS revolutionary. Don't let these kiddies try to make you think they've thought of something new...yet... In fact, many are retro listeners (Led Zepplin, etc.) and recently I purchased a CD called Tony C & The Truth -- Back to the roots of rock, baby.
     
  14. Apr 11, 2005 #13
    The top 40 radio station and the hip-hop/R&B station (at least the ones I listen to) in Los Angeles have a tremendous amount of overlap, so yes, popular music is pretty urban now. The only real rock song I've heard on top-40 radio recently is Green Day's Boulevard of Broken Dreams. Apart from that, Linkin Park's Numb, and Hoobastank's The Reason also made it onto popular radio, though it might be stretching it to call them rock.

    I spent quite a few years not listening to very much rock, but now I found myself drawn back to it, mostly stuff from the 90's, probably because it captures my mood the best these days. The alternative rock station in LA, KROQ, does a pretty good job of playing 90's and 00's rock. None of the new stuff is amazingly good, though I do enjoy tracks from The Killers.

    Is rock dead? I don't think so. I'm willing to bet there will be at least another great rock band, a la Nirvana, sometime in the future.

    Also - even if no new music of any sort were produced starting today, I would still not have enough time during the rest of my life to fully listen to and enjoy what has already been produced.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2005
  15. Apr 11, 2005 #14

    Evo

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    I remember that! :tongue:

    Nothing gets your toe to tapping more than an accordian. :approve:

    My grandmother always watched Lawrence Welk. The younger generation has really missed out. :biggrin:
     
  16. Apr 11, 2005 #15
    When I think of what groups would epitomize the heart of rock and roll (Hewey Luis?) groups/artists like Huey Luis, Pink Floyd, Jimmy Hendrix, Rolling Stones, Deep Purple, and maybe some Steve Miller, Bob Seger, Jefferson Starship (wait.. not Jefferson Starship), and hell, why not Bob Marley, Jim Croce, Grateful Dead, Joe Cocker, Jimmy Buffet (yay parrot heads)

    The first karaoke song I ever sang was Frosty the Snowman. It was October at the time and someone put me up to it. But the second one was Margaritaville. It's a perverse pleasure I admit.

    There are dozens that I've left out, but those are the ones that immediately come to my mind. Many of them were around before I was even born. I don't recall my parents listening to them. I'm not sure how I cam to be interested in these artists. It's a mystery.

    What was the question?
    Huck Mom
     
  17. Apr 11, 2005 #16

    Evo

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    He's referring to music from the 90's as old. :uhh:

    Hi, my name is Evo, and I'm older than Ivan. :cry:
     
  18. Apr 11, 2005 #17
    Is there a way to properly dance a polka?
     
  19. Apr 11, 2005 #18

    Moonbear

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    That even makes me old! :grumpy: :cry: I still remember my dismay when the radio stations started calling 80's music "oldies." :cry:
     
  20. Apr 11, 2005 #19

    Moonbear

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    There is...you jump up and down in circles...or something like that. :biggrin:

    Seriously, there is, but I don't know how to do it.
     
  21. Apr 11, 2005 #20

    Evo

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    Just what are they going to call music between 2000 & 2010? You've got the 50's 60's, 70's, etc... Or even 2011 & 2012? the 0's & the ten's just isn't catchy.
     
  22. Apr 11, 2005 #21

    Moonbear

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    Meh, it's all the same as the stuff they've been playing since the 90s anyway. They better start working on some new sounds. I'll be sorely disappointed if I have kids and they're still listening to music I like. You can't deprive me of my god-given right to shout at teenage children, "Turn down that racket!" :grumpy:

    I guess they could call it "music from the turn of the millenium." That's catchier than 0s and 10s.
     
  23. Apr 11, 2005 #22
    Holy crap!! Two pages of lamentations about the demise of Rock 'n Roll, and not one mention of the doowop era?

    It seems not even you "old" folks remember the music I grew up with. :cry: :cry:
     
  24. Apr 11, 2005 #23

    hypnagogue

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    I don't think rock can be proclaimed dead just because it's no longer the dominant style that gets played on all the radio stations. I mean, that might even be a good sign-- I really can't recall listening to any 'popular' radio station that wasn't mostly garbage. I think there are a number of good rock artists out nowadays, though most of them are to varying degrees 'underground' kind of bands, I guess.
     
  25. Apr 11, 2005 #24
    Well my Parents were hippies and I really love the rock n roll their generation represented, but like all things rock has evolved. I not only love that old rock but I love the harder stuff of my generation and in a sence no rock will never die but be there for future generations to explore and enjoy. I think sometimes its a bit harder to accept new music and its rare i see someone my fathers age rocking out to like Metallica or TOOL yet you will see many of the younger generation listening to older stuff like Floyd Hendrix ect so is it possible that its the older generation that needs to open their mind some?
     
  26. Apr 11, 2005 #25

    Evo

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    I agree, rock isn't dead, it's evolving. I love the new bands and music that my kids listen to, it's great. I can't see my self trapped into a certain "style" of rock, I have found things I've liked with each new wave. I currently listen to "underground" and alternative" which is so funny because that's what we called it in the 60's and early 70's.

    I cannot listen to "Pop" music. Watching a show like American Idol would probably make me want to puncture my eardrums. :surprised
     
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