Is the book wrong about the work done by the equation 8x-16 from 0 to 3?

  • Thread starter whatdofisheat
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In summary, the conversation involved a discussion of finding the work done by the equation 8x-16 from 0 to 3. The suggested integration of the equation yielded an answer of -28, while the book's answer was -12. It was pointed out that equations do not technically "do" work, but rather represent forces moving objects. The conversation then delved into the issue of dimensionless answers in math problems and the importance of understanding the meaning behind the numerical solutions.
  • #1
whatdofisheat
24
0
i am haveing some trouble solvine a simple question
the question is what is the work done by the equation
8x-16
from 0 to 3
if you intagrate it you should get
4x^2 -16x
then you sub in zero get zero then you sub in 3 and get -28?
yet the answer in the book is -12 am i doing something wrong?
or is the book wrong?
 
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  • #2
I think that you made a mistake in your calculations, subbing 3 in gives
4*(9)-48=36-48=-12 =)
 
  • #3
thanks i knew it was a stupid thing I am being an idoit
 
  • #4
Pat yourself on the back for integrating correctly atleast :)
 
  • #5
ya but if i can't times 3 by 16 correctly i think the intergration is the least of my worries
 
  • #6
what is the work done by the equation
8x-16
from 0 to 3

Would it be petty of me to point out that equations don't DO work?

What you mean I presume is that the force is given by F(x)= 8x-16 and moves an object from x= 0 to x= 3.
 
  • #7
You make an interesting point, but keep in mind that many of these problems in math always have an answer that is dimensionless... Yes it is better to write the work done by some force moving a particle... but when the solutions key gives an answer with no units, that really annoys me... so I don't really see anything wrong with saying "the work done by an equation." Same with surface integrals... answers are dimensionless... which is why I like to see applications of math. What does it mean when a surface integral evaluates to "16pi"? What does it mean when the work done is "5" ?
 
  • #8
yes its petty
 
  • #9
Tell me more
 

1. What is integration?

Integration is a mathematical concept that involves finding the area under a curve. It is used to solve a variety of problems in various fields such as physics, engineering, and economics.

2. Why is integration important?

Integration is important because it allows us to find the total amount or accumulation of something over a given interval. It is also used to solve many real-world problems and is a fundamental concept in calculus.

3. How can I make integration easier?

One way to make integration easier is by using integration techniques such as substitution, integration by parts, and partial fractions. It is also helpful to practice and familiarize yourself with different types of integrals.

4. What are some common mistakes when integrating?

Some common mistakes when integrating include forgetting to add the constant of integration, mixing up the limits of integration, and making algebraic errors during the integration process. It is important to double-check your work and be careful with algebraic manipulations.

5. Are there any resources available to help with integration?

Yes, there are many online resources available to help with integration. There are also textbooks, videos, and practice problems that can aid in understanding and mastering integration. Seeking help from a tutor or teacher can also be beneficial.

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