Is there a minimum unit of time in string theory?

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between strings and time in string theory. It is mentioned that strings do not make time, but rather exist in spacetime and participate in it. The concept of decaying vibrations in strings is also brought up. The possibility of defining time in terms of string theory and the idea of a minimum unit of time, the Planck time, are also mentioned. It is suggested that since strings are a Planck length in size, they cannot exist in a smaller space and therefore, cannot be measured in smaller units of time.
  • #1
hamlet69
24
0
do string make time or does time make strings , since strings have varoius vibrations, do there have a decay rate? just a question maybe one of you might know an answer?
 
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  • #2
strings do not make time in ordinary string theory. They exist in spacetime and participate in the time from that. I don't know about decaying vibrations in strings. In fact I think it's only recently that anyone has worked on strings at a finite temperature, where you might discuss entropy. This is all just a rumor to me, perhaps someone more learned will chip in.
 
  • #3
I think it depends on if time is relative. Does time require measurement or does it exist outside of that measurement?

Has anyone thought to define time in terms of string theory? Or is it taken for granted and still measured as it is?
 
  • #4
time in string theory

Just posted a thread of defining time in string theory. The title is "minimum time" and its found in this (Strings, Branes and LQG) forum. In gist, the smallest unit of time is the Planck time (defined as the amount of time it takes light to travel a Planck distance). Since a string is a Planck length in size, it cannot fit into a smaller space. Therefore, when a photon travels through a Planck distance, it takes up the whole space and can only be defined as a whole string within that amount of time, no less. In other words, if all matter is manifested as a vibrating string, it cannot exist without defining a whole string.
 

1. Do strings have a decay rate?

Yes, strings do have a decay rate. This refers to the gradual deterioration of the string over time due to factors such as tension, temperature, and humidity.

2. What causes a string's decay rate?

The decay rate of a string is primarily caused by the tension placed on it, which can gradually weaken the fibers of the string over time. Other factors such as temperature and humidity can also contribute to the decay rate.

3. How does a string's decay rate affect its sound?

A string's decay rate can significantly impact its sound. As the string decays, it may lose its ability to vibrate properly, resulting in a duller, less resonant sound. This can also cause the string to break more easily.

4. Can a string's decay rate be slowed down or prevented?

While a string's decay rate cannot be completely prevented, it can be slowed down through proper care and maintenance. This includes keeping the strings clean, avoiding extreme temperatures and humidity, and regularly replacing old strings.

5. How often should strings be replaced to maintain a consistent decay rate?

This can vary depending on factors such as playing frequency and style, as well as the quality and type of strings. As a general rule, it is recommended to replace strings every 3-6 months for optimal sound and performance.

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