Is there a physiological explanation for having to pee?

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In summary, when solving a problem, the mind becomes distracted and may not notice the build-up of urine in the bladder. Once a solution is found, the mind returns to bodily functions, causing the urge to urinate. This can also be caused by increased physical activity and pressure on the bladder. Drinking coffee may also contribute to the need to urinate frequently while working.
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PBRMEASAP
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I've noticed that when I have been thinking about some problem for a while and finally have a good insight, I immediately have the urge to pee. Has anyone heard of this before? Is there a physiological explanation?
 
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because you've been sitting there sufficiently long enough for urine to build up in your bladder, but you haven't been paying attention to it because you've been distracted with the business of solving a particular problem. Once you come up with a solution, your mind returns to other things you've been putting off, like bodily functions. That's all I can figure.
 
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That makes sense, especially if you're like me and drink lots of coffee while working ;) Do you actually end up having a full enough bladder, or do you just get the urge to urinate without excreting the usual amount of urine?
 
  • #4
Math Is Hard said:
because you've been sitting there sufficiently long enough for urine to build up in your bladder, but you haven't been paying attention to it because you've been distracted with the business of solving a particular problem. Once you come up with a solution, your mind returns to other things you've been putting off, like bodily functions. That's all I can figure.
You know, I bet that's exactly what it is. But to answer honestrosewater's question, it often just seems to be more urge than anything. If I have several good ideas in a short time interval (rare), I feel the need to urinate each time, so I usually do. I also drink coffee when I work, but not excessively. At least not enough that I would actually need to go that much. Thanks for the serious answers, even though the subject is kinda funny. :smile:
 
  • #5
Another possibility is that, when your inspiration hits, you become more active, even if you are sitting. You body will reflect the excitement of the your mind in this respect.

This will put pressure on your bladder and cause you to notice it where you hadn't when sitting still.
 

Related to Is there a physiological explanation for having to pee?

1. What causes the urge to pee?

The urge to pee, also known as urinary urgency, is caused by the bladder filling up with urine. This triggers nerve signals to the brain, which then sends a signal to the bladder muscles to contract and the urethral sphincter to relax, resulting in the need to urinate.

2. Why do we have to pee more often when we drink a lot of fluids?

When we consume fluids, they are absorbed into the bloodstream and eventually filtered by the kidneys. As more fluid is processed, the bladder fills up quicker and signals the brain to urinate. This is why we may feel the urge to pee more often when we drink a lot of fluids.

3. Is there a difference in the urge to pee between men and women?

Yes, there are some physiological differences in the urge to pee between men and women. Women have a shorter urethra, which means they have a smaller bladder capacity and may feel the urge to pee more frequently. Additionally, the female urethral sphincter is less developed, making it easier for urine to escape when the bladder is full.

4. Can certain foods or drinks make us have to pee more?

Yes, some foods and drinks act as diuretics, which means they increase urine production and can make us have to pee more frequently. These include caffeine, alcohol, and spicy foods. Additionally, foods high in water content, such as fruits and vegetables, can also contribute to a full bladder and the urge to pee.

5. Why do we have to pee more as we age?

As we age, our bladder muscles and urinary sphincter may weaken, resulting in a decrease in bladder capacity and control. This can lead to more frequent urination and the urge to pee. Other factors such as hormonal changes, prostate enlargement in men, and neurological conditions can also contribute to increased urination as we age.

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