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Is there a term for this?

  1. Oct 13, 2014 #1
    When a singer is performing a song, and they're singing syllables which are not words or have any meaning, but only have some aesthetic quality.

    For example, "la la la" or here in this song from about 2:25-2:50



    What is the term or word for this?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 13, 2014 #2
    Scat singing is perhaps the closest description?
     
  4. Oct 13, 2014 #3
    Hi! Maybe there is another more modern term, I'm not sure/don't remember, but otherwise there is something called "scat singing":
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scat_singing

    (EDIT: Another post just before mine about it, I was a couple of seconds late...))
     
  5. Oct 13, 2014 #4
    Couldn't resist posting this clip: :)
     
  6. Oct 13, 2014 #5
    Morrissey isn't scat singing in the linked song. What he's doing is closer to yodeling, though it isn't all that way over into yodeling.

    I can't think of any blanket term that covers all singing of meaningless sounds.
     
  7. Oct 13, 2014 #6

    TumblingDice

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    "Non-lexical vocables" is the umbrella term. There are specific terms for different genres, such as 'scat' in jazz already mentioned. Doo-Wop (Sha-Na-Na, "Get a Job"), blurred lyrics ("Mairzy Doats"), and nonsense (Disney's done quite a few, "Zip-a-dee-Doo-Dah", "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" et al.)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-lexical_vocables_in_music
     
  8. Oct 15, 2014 #7
    Ha, well that's about as straight forward as it gets. I'm surprised there's not a more colloquial term though.
     
  9. Oct 17, 2014 #8

    SteamKing

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    It referred to as 'vocal improvisation', where the voice is manipulated to act as another musical instrument:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scat_singing
     
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