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Is there such a device?

  1. Feb 5, 2007 #1
    I have another question. Is there a device which currently exists which can produce in the region of 10^25 electrons per second? I have to admit, I am a bit doubtful as to the existance of such a device simply because of the sheer number of electrons which it must produce.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 5, 2007 #2

    russ_watters

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    That's a million amps. If half of a 1000 megawatt power plant's energy ends up as 220v power, that's 4.3 million amps at the usage points.

    The question is a little odd, though...the electrons aren't "produced" at the generator, they are just pushed around in a circle.
     
  4. Feb 5, 2007 #3

    ZapperZ

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    Well, russ, I produce at our accelerator as high as 110 nC per pulse, and we can pulse as high as 10 Hz., so that's 1100 nC per second. Quick, how many electrons is that? :)

    Zz.
     
  5. Feb 5, 2007 #4

    russ_watters

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    Fair enough - not a lot of particle accelerators in the air conditioning systems I design...

    ....though I don't know what an nC is....
     
  6. Feb 5, 2007 #5

    Integral

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    nC = nanoCoulomb
     
  7. Feb 5, 2007 #6

    NoTime

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    C=6.24150962915265 ×10^18 elementary charges.
     
  8. Feb 6, 2007 #7

    russ_watters

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    Ok, so, is that a typo...? Did he mean mC? What am I missing here? The op asked about a million amps and that's a millionth of an amp...
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2007
  9. Feb 6, 2007 #8
    nano = 10^-9
    Coulomb = 10^18

    nC = 10^(18-9)=10^9

    Thats a big number. Its small in terms of amps, but large in terms of number of electrons.

    Its all relative.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2007
  10. Feb 6, 2007 #9

    ZapperZ

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    No, it's "nC". It doesn't produce quite 10^25 charge per second, but it is still in the 10^20, which is, from what I've been told, the "world record" for charge per bunch, at least in an L-band accelerator.

    Zz.
     
  11. Feb 6, 2007 #10

    russ_watters

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    Ok, so I guess then the point is just that that is the most electrons you can have existing on their own (free of a wire)? A AA battery pushes around more than that, though, so I guess which is relevant depends on what the OP means by "produce"...
     
  12. Oct 31, 2007 #11
    Thanks for the idea about the megawatt power generators. I used it in this post where I need million ampere current to create high power magnetic fields:

    Ultra high magnetic fields using carbon nanotubes.
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=193266


    Bob Clark
     
  13. Oct 31, 2007 #12
    Zz, I've heard of table top accelerators able to get extremely high voltages or currents by accelerating electrons.
    For my application I need the high voltages/currents to be maintained.
    Do your systems allow this to take place.


    Bob Clark
     
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