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Is there such thing as AntiGravity?

  1. Apr 1, 2005 #1
    Well I was curious. And this is the place to ask. I saw several "Anti Gravity" advertisements (by google) above on this site. As well as I heard rumors area 51 was working on this idea. Is it a known property? Or just a theory?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 2, 2005 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    There was a Russian scientist claiming to generate anti-gravity, but in the end no one could reproduce his results. On the other hand, Dark Energy does appear to be real.

    See this thread for details:
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=68550

    Dark Energy
    http://physicsweb.org/articles/world/17/5/7
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2005
  4. Apr 10, 2005 #3
    negative ?

    There are so many adverts for books on most any conceiveable subject
    The problem with this is that the sponsors of the advert have little interest in it's truth -- just like TV adverts .
    I am afraid that the more lurid the subject (more likely to sell ) the more they seem to support them .
    You have to form your own opinion of these things -- sometimes very difficult --- but there are GOOD sources of information and some allow questions . The current good magazines -- Scientifican American -- Discovery
    Nature and so on are generally upto date ( the articles are probably a year old ) but if there was something valid as new knowledge it would probably appear there -- clearly anti gravity does not . These sources even tho
    hardly perfect -- do have to keep up a reputation they are in the real public eye They live and die by their info --- Google and Yahoo do not only by referencing you in searches .
    If you wish to compare do a search on 'perpetual motion machines '
    I am sure you will end up with a hundred thousand possible sources -- all bogus.
    Ps as opposed to what Russ said there have serios doubts cast on 'Dark energy ' just in the last month or two.
    Ray.
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2005
  5. Apr 10, 2005 #4
    I saw something once where powerful electromagnetic fields were used to levitate any object that would fit in the machine. It was completely harmless to living things. They put a frog into it and it just floated in midair inside this rather narrow tube. It didn't seem practical on a large scale but I found it interesting.

    A few months ago I was wondering why there are no maps that show the entire world without distortion. I was wondering what a map like this might look like and I came up with an hourglass shape. If the Earth is split from pole to pole, because that is approximately its rotational axis, and made two dimensional then the equator would be the shortest horizontal distance across. It would also be the only accurate measurement to a round world. As the latitude rises the distance would flare out exponentially until it reaches the pole where it would extend out to the Planck length because it is trying to express a point in two dimensions.

    From that model I realized that the auroraborealis is a magnetic effect that takes place most often at the poles, the place on the 2d map with the most distortion. Does the very act of bending matter into 3 dimensions create this magnetic effect at some point where dimensional resistance is weakest? Is this how large amounts of electromagnetism can be used to counter small amounts of gravity? Could the same hold true for the bending of other dimensions? Are the field properties of space caused by bending in certain dimensions? (1st and 2nd perhaps?)

    Just an idea.

    What was the question?
    Huck
     
  6. Apr 10, 2005 #5

    chroot

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    Using electromagnetic forces to counter gravity is not "antigravity." Antigravity, according to current theory, cannot exist.

    - Warren
     
  7. Apr 10, 2005 #6

    chroot

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    There is no way to map a sphere to a plane without introducing distortion. Many different projections exist (orthographic, Mercator, etc.) which have different sorts of distortions, but there cannot be a projection which does not have any distortion.
    You're getting into a lot of speculative nonsense here, which is not welcome on this site.

    The aurora happen near the magnetic poles because the magnetic field lines are closer together there. End of story.

    - Warren
     
  8. Apr 10, 2005 #7
    I've also heard that small amounts of anti-matter is being collected in magnetic jars that are kept at low temperatures at some laboratories and universities. If anti-matter exists then would it not have antigravitic properties?

    Huck
     
  9. Apr 10, 2005 #8

    chroot

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    No. Antimatter has normal gravitational interaction.

    - Warren
     
  10. Apr 10, 2005 #9
    Anti-matter particles are particles with opposite charges i.e. a positron--electron with a + charge. http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/antimatter_sun_030929.html

    Gravity OTH is a force. We don't know where it comes from exactly, but that doesn't necessarily mean there is an anti-gravity force. Should we classify the lift a wing produces as anti-gravity (it is a force which opposes gravity as we feel it here on earth). No because said lift does not negate the gravitational force from the sun on the airplane. Basically, there is no force that we know of the negates the force of gravity. Some forces may act counter to gravity here on earth, but gravity is still acting on the objects being lifted or held up; moreover, the effects of gravity from the universe as a whole are not canceled out.

    Your anti-particles though have mass and as such feel the effects of gravity. Light reacts to gravity. The universe reacts to large masses http://einstein.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/highlights/showpic.cgi?name=sb1-120304-gpb-diagram.jpg but there is no antheses to gravity as we know it yet.
     
  11. Apr 11, 2005 #10

    Gokul43201

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    1. Why is this in electrical engineering ?

    2. No, there is, as of now, no such thing as antigravity. The Podkletnov Effect has not been reproduced.

    3. Why is this thread alive ? It seems to be attracting too much fantasy and nonscience.

    4. If there are antigravity ads being linked to, perhaps Greg should be informed, so he may ban them.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2005
  12. Apr 11, 2005 #11

    enigma

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    Agreed.

    off to S&D it goes.
     
  13. Apr 11, 2005 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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