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Stargazing Is this a good telescope?

  1. Jan 10, 2018 #1
    I just bought this it will be my first telescope. I won't post the link to the website but I'll post the name and description of the telescope :)

    INTEY Ultra-Clear Telescope Christmas Gift Portable Astronomy Telescope Entry-level Telescope for Astronomers and Children (with an Additional Rucksack)

    • 70 MM ULTRA-CLEAR TELESCOPE - This fantastic telescope can ensure good imagine quality, correct lateral chromatic aberration, congitudinal chromatic aberration and distortion, with 70 mm larger caliber, 5X24 finderscope and the latest generation of Kellner eyepiece(K).
    • MAGNIFICATION - 16X, 67X. K6mm eyepiece for 67X, K25mm eyepiece for 16X. Finderscope for 5X maganification. Focal length: 400mm. Aperture: 70 mm.
    • ADJUSTABLE TRIPOD - Scalability aluminum tripod, height can be adjusted from about 16-inch to 41-inch, and it permit to use the telescope both in standing or sitting position .
    • DEW SHIELD & DUST SHIELD - With a dew shield and dust cap, one can use it without worry about fogging on the surface of primary mirror and keep tube device from dust in normal times . Amazing telescope for travel and camping.
    • PORTABLE & RELIABLE- Easy to intall and disassemble, with an adtional rucksack for transporting it around and keeping it protected whilst he's not using it. Suitable for beginners to explore land & sky! Offers 24-month warranty, quick replies in case of problem, and instant refunds.
    Thanks :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 10, 2018 #2

    phyzguy

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    What are you hoping to see? A 70mm aperture is not much light gathering capacity. You will get some good views of the Moon and the bigger planets like Jupiter and Saturn, but you won't see much when looking at faint galaxies.
     
  4. Jan 10, 2018 #3
    Yeah mainly Jupiter and Saturn first, and maybe try and make out some slightly faint stars. Was hoping maybe a few of the nearest galaxies, and star clusters.
     
  5. Jan 10, 2018 #4

    phyzguy

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    Bright star clusters like the Pleiades and the Beehive should look cool. And brighter globular clusters like M13. Also try the ring nebula M57, and the Orion nebula M42.
     
  6. Jan 10, 2018 #5

    Bandersnatch

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    It seems like a very nice telescope for watching close, bright objects that you can easily track. The Moon is the obvious target. Should be enough to just about discern Saturn's rings or Jupiter's moons.

    The altazimuth mount will make observing anything at large magnification a pain, and the poor light gathering capacity will pretty much preclude seeing galaxies and nebulae as anything other than blueish, diffuse blobs.

    Overall, I think it's good at what it aims to do - being an entry-level telescope. You'll learn a lot about what observations entail, as well as what you can expect to see, and will likely find out if it's worth investing in anything more advanced.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2018 #6

    russ_watters

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    I think it is about par for a first scope. I am intrigued by the idea of a camera-style tripod head to replace the old alt-az style mount heads. The possible downside is that poor tripod heads can be sticky, but at least you can guide it straight to where you want it to go, unlike the alt-az, which usually has a screw to adjust for the alt. I went on a vacation last year to Africa and took a spotting scope on a bad tripod and while it was a bit of a pain, I was able to see and show people all the bright planets and moon.

    And don't listen to people who say 70mm is too small: 60mm has been the standard first telescope aperture for 50 years.
     
  8. Jan 12, 2018 #7
    069B9F95-C7BD-4388-9C10-9A6045E754AB.jpg

    I seem to be missing a screw or something because there's a hole where you put the eyepiece lens in. And the eyepiece lens is loose. :/
     
  9. Jan 12, 2018 #8

    davenn

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    oops .... they are all usually the same size/thread on all scopes
    look carefully around in all the packing and on the floor ... it may still be around

    if you cant find, a local scope shop will probably be able to supply one
     
  10. Jan 12, 2018 #9
    Yes I found it :D
     
  11. Jan 12, 2018 #10

    davenn

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    yes, but don't expect to see them as you do in photographs or you will be deeply disappointed

    through small to moderate sized scopes, there is practically zero colour observable by the eye


    Dave
     
  12. Jan 13, 2018 #11

    sophiecentaur

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    A pair of 10 X 50 binoculars on a tripod is a marvellous way into observational astronomy so 70mm is fine.
    Ain't that the truth? But one becomes very realistic about this and just finding and recognising an astronomical object for yourself can give you a real buzz, even when it isn't as impressive as the images they post on Nasa. If you remember that nearly every picture you see on the Web or in a book would have been taken with a 'good' scope and involved an exposure time of many minutes (/hours, possibly)
    If you can get to a really dark site (no street lamps for miles) you will be amazed at how much better the telescope seems to work. That's mainly down to your eyes getting well dark adapted.
     
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