Is this a Meteorite?

  • Thread starter Het Patel
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  • #26
Baluncore
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It looks to me like it was water worn, and has developed a patina during long exposure.
I want to know exactly where it was found. Latitude and longitude ?
Was it found in a riverbed, on a beach, in a desert, or maybe in an agricultural field ?
 
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  • #27
Vanadium 50
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It sounds like you don't want us to tell you if it is a meteorite; you want us to tell you that it is a meteorite.
 
  • #28
davenn
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It looks like earth rock because it may be stony meteorites?? View attachment 284860its fusion crust looks somewhat similar to 2nd one

Again, There is NO fusion crust. You need to learn what a fusion crust looks like
I have given you a couple of examples. There are many more in that link I gave you

Also, meteorites are pretty much never egg shaped as you rocks are
look at my pic's I posted earlier, they are chunky/blocky rocks
as are these ones ......

DSCN1968.jpg


met1.jpg



Dave
 
  • #29
Baluncore
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The surface patina shows pits due to rapid chemical weathering of some minor mineral component. Around here those pits are typical of diabase (dolerite) water worn river pebbles.

When the hot meteorite slows down and begins to cool in the lower atmosphere, the surface shrinks first, opening cooling cracks in the surface. Then the inside cools and shrinks which partly closes the surface cracks. I see no cooling cracks in the OP's pictures.
 
  • #30
davenn
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I see no cooling cracks in the OP's pictures.


That, as I have said several times, is, because it isnt a meteorite :wink: :wink: :smile:
 
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  • #31
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Het Patel -
Like the others, overall it does not strike one as meteoric origin.
Looks more like a dense basalt that's been river tumbled into the shape it now has.
Basalt can be magnetic since it's rich in iron.
It can also have olivine crystals which colors can vary.
A local university with a decent geology department should be able to thin section it and put it on a petrographic microscope which will definitively answer the question.
 
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  • #32
davenn
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When the hot meteorite slows down and begins to cool in the lower atmosphere, the surface shrinks first, opening cooling cracks in the surface. Then the inside cools and shrinks which partly closes the surface cracks.


Actually, I will clarify that comment. I should have done so when I first read it.
Not all stone meteorites end up with a cracked fusion crust. Some are, most are not. See the examples I posted from my collection
near the start of the thread.

Contraction cracking is caused the strong cooling high in the atmosphere, 15 - 20 km or so. This can be as it passes through particularly
cool layers of the atmosphere. A fellow collector who does indepth meteorite studies commented that frost can form on the fusion crust
causing the cracks and in extreme cases a layer of ice can form, making those cracks even more pronounced.

Surprisingly, the inside of the meteoroid doesn't heat up overly much. Rock is a very good heat insulator.

My favourite cracked crust meteorite's is Ghadamis from NW Africa, Algeria, from memory.
This is a 1.45kg sample.

Brett Joseph 1.45kg Ghadamis2.jpg
 

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