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Is this an ego thing, a dishonesty thing, or a smart thing to do? (concerning grades)

  • Thread starter Raizy
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Here is my current situation, as a high school drop out, I can continue my education at a so called Adult Education Center. This means I can choose my schedule that best fits my needs.

Here is the thing, should I do only 2 classes a day and try my best to get close to 100% in my classes, or should I do 3/4 classes per day, but end up probably getting 65-80% in my classes resulting in poor admittance chance for applying to universities?

But if I do 2 classes, or even 3 in order to give myself breathing room to obtain grades over 85%, am I just lying to myself and the university about my true capabilities?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
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if you put the effort in, you can achieve good marks with a full schedule.
 
  • #3
symbolipoint
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Here is the thing, should I do only 2 classes a day and try my best to get close to 100% in my classes, or should I do 3/4 classes per day, but end up probably getting 65-80% in my classes resulting in poor admittance chance for applying to universities?
Did you earn all the credits to qualify for university/college level course placement? For just the Mathematics, if you did not successfully complete three years of college preparatory Mathematics before you dropped from high school, then you are not ready for Trigonometry or College Algebra, so attending a university may not be so soon practical. The adult school will be limited, at best, to offering Algebra 1 and College Preparatory Geometry, but NOT Algebra 2 or higher.
You can make up whatever you are missing from your adult diploma by attending a community college.
 
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  • #4
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I'm already finished the Math and English (I lack confidence in their math program though -- the textbook seemed to skimmed through) to gain entrance to their technology programs.

Anyways, I just had a major decision made because I was just been told that there was such thing as, at least here in Ontario, an education center for adults who seek the credits they require.

I made an appointment with the center on the 16th, so I'll see how the reality of things goes.

If I can't grab the "Academic" math courses at the center, there is always online courses that offers them so that will be my last resort (dear lord I hate online "courses")
 
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  • #5
atyy
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I don't know what the universities look for, but certainly choosing the option that gives you mastery of the material will lay the solidest foundation for future progress.
 
  • #6
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I would strongly recommend to avoid taking any online or correspondence courses. The success rate is extremely low. Even if you are the type of person who can learn independently, many people do not complete the course or stick to their planned schedule. Even if you start off strong in the course, there is a good chance you won't complete it.

That may seem a bit strong, but it's based on my past experience and observations. I've seen many people waste their time. If you've successfully finished online courses before then feel free to ignore my advice. Otherwise - beware!
 
  • #7
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Even if you are the type of person who can learn independently, many people do not complete the course or stick to their planned schedule. Even if you start off strong in the course, there is a good chance you won't complete it.
I definitely feel for you. People need the stimulating traditional classroom setting, a face to face instructor+black board, and the adrenaline rush from a deadline.
 
  • #8
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There are, however, obviously some people who have successfully completed online courses. It's just that none of my schoolmates or myself have ever been able to. I used to overhear my school's counselor having conversations over and over where he would try to discourage people from taking online courses. His reason was the huge difference in success rates between in-class courses and online courses. As you said, keep it as a backup plan.
 
  • #9
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Put it to you like this. You can go to any school you want. You can do any courses you want. You can do whatever you want. Always remember this though, the system balance will always balance itself out. If you take a class and want an A, make sure you realize that the A is worthless if you don't care about the material or you could just cheat your way through. Earning the A takes more time, so you know yourself, your study habits, your responsibilities other than school. Examine yourself and you will see what your own motivations and intentions are. I don't believe it is possible to lie to yourself, but that is a a highly debated issue that does not matter here. Decide if college is really the goal you want to set. At the end of your life, what would be the perfect life that you had lived? If you can imagine that which may take a while, but its worth it. If you can imagine it, you can take the steps necessary to reach your goal and college may be the right direction. Good luck.
 
  • #10
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But if I do 2 classes, or even 3 in order to give myself breathing room to obtain grades over 85%, am I just lying to myself and the university about my true capabilities?
No you aren't.

A lot of surviving academia and business is to do good planning, and allocate your time and energy so that you get maximize results.
 
  • #11
6,814
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I would strongly recommend to avoid taking any online or correspondence courses. The success rate is extremely low. Even if you are the type of person who can learn independently, many people do not complete the course or stick to their planned schedule. Even if you start off strong in the course, there is a good chance you won't complete it.
It really depends on the person. Doing things online requires a lot of self-discipline, and if one weakness of the student is self-discipline, it's not going to work.

One thing that I have noticed is that people with military backgrounds tend to do extremely well with online and correspondence courses. Also online and correspondence courses work extremely well with people that are used to an office environment and have already trained themselves to get out of bed and punch a time clock.
 

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