Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Is this perpetual motion?

  1. Dec 1, 2013 #1
    Hi Experts

    I am wondering if my understanding of perpetual motion is correct.

    I use solar energy to supply energy needed to reset the cycle of a motion.

    In short, the extra energy needed to reset a cycle is provided by another source of free energy.

    This way, the motion is kept perpetual using multi-sources of free energy to provide for the energy needed to reset the cycle, that is, to repeat the cycle .

    Is this considered perpetual motion?

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 1, 2013 #2
    No, that's just solar power. The sun won't burn forever.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2013 #3

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Unless your system is used to power the sun, you are using an external power source (solar energy) to do work. This is no different than a hydroelectric turbine being turned by an external power source, which is water flow.

    Please note that perpetual motion and overunity machines is a banned topic. This thread is being kept open because it is simply a misunderstanding of what "perpetual motion" is, and the neglected consideration of an external energy source going into the system.

    Zz.
     
  5. Dec 2, 2013 #4
    Thanks Experts, for allowing to ask the question.

    My point is, using multiple free energy sources, motion can also be sustained perpetually.

    So, there is no need for Perpetual motion as motion can be sustained perpetually using multiple free energy sources. The effect is still free energy perpetually.

    Thanks and have a nice day.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2013 #5

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It's not perpetual. The Sun has a finite amount of fuel and will eventually stop emitting light.
     
  7. Dec 2, 2013 #6

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    You are free to call it a cow if you wish in the privacy of your own home. However, you need to understand the definition of the terms you are using if you are communicating with other people, and especially its usage in physics. You are not free to simply redefine such terms to suit your needs.

    Your system uses EXTERNAL ENERGY SOURCE to power it. Be it wind, solar, water, etc... When it does that, it is not a "perpetual motion machine". It does not generate and then use its own energy, which is the usual definition of what a perpetual motion is.

    This question has been satisfactorily answered. Thread closed.

    Zz.
     
  8. Dec 2, 2013 #7

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Is this perpetual motion?
  1. Perpetual Motion (Replies: 19)

  2. Perpetual Motion. (Replies: 4)

  3. Perpetual Motion (Replies: 2)

  4. Perpetual "Motion" (Replies: 11)

  5. Perpetual motion (Replies: 3)

Loading...