1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Is this person wrong?

  1. Jun 28, 2016 #1
    They said this: "Luckily, joules are equivalent to one newton's energy transfer across one meter of stuff, which means we can still get our answer, since joules are convertible to TNT megatons. 5.37498 x 10^31 newtons is 5.37498 10^37 joules per meter"

    How??? shouldnt the exponent be the same for the joules?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 28, 2016 #2

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Please reference where this statement is taken from.
     
  4. Jun 28, 2016 #3
  5. Jun 28, 2016 #4

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I suggest paying absolutely no attention to that "answer" whatsoever.
     
  6. Jun 28, 2016 #5
    ok. why?
     
  7. Jun 28, 2016 #6

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Because it contains a large number of erroneous statements.
     
  8. Jun 28, 2016 #7
    like the joules not being = to newtons, but what else?
     
  9. Jun 28, 2016 #8

    SteamKing

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Isn't that enough?

    You yourself pointed out the discrepancy in the exponents of the "conversion".

    I suspect the author's degree will be one of those "self-awarded" B.S. degrees - all B.S., no substance.
     
  10. Jun 28, 2016 #9
    so much for a oppterunty to learn things i do not know
     
  11. Jun 28, 2016 #10

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    You have lots of opportunities to learn things you do not know. The internet generally is only a good place to do it if you have reliable resources. Physics Forums has a large amount of knowledgable members and you will often get great answers. We are not a replacement for a textbook though.
     
  12. Jun 28, 2016 #11
    becuz u guys dont want to help me learn simple things, cuz you clearly have your own little clique. w/e im done here, you guys need to learn how to treat people
     
  13. Jun 28, 2016 #12

    Drakkith

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Nonsense. We just don't feel like pointing out every little error in someone's post online. Did you expect us to?
     
  14. Jun 28, 2016 #13
    As pointed out, ignore the article.

    You have learned something.
    The article has errors.
    You have pointed out one error.
    Posters are agreeing with you.
    Thus, you have learned that your own physics knowledge may be better than that of the author.
    Thus, move on from that that article.

    A blatant error such as the one below shows that the has author has taken as little as possible effort to get, or to make sure, things are correct.
     
  15. Jun 28, 2016 #14

    NascentOxygen

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    If this is your question, then yes, the exponents should indeed be equal.
     
  16. Jun 28, 2016 #15

    Orodruin

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I honestly have a really hard time to imagine how this was the conclusion you drew from my post ...
     
  17. Jun 28, 2016 #16

    NascentOxygen

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Looks like OP has got his answer. His source is unreliable and contains multiple errors.

    Thread closed.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Is this person wrong?
  1. Is it wrong? (Replies: 15)

  2. Personal development? (Replies: 17)

  3. Person in an Elevator (Replies: 2)

  4. Mass of a person (Replies: 22)

Loading...