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Isn't acceleration a constant?

  1. Aug 23, 2007 #1
    The position of a particle as a function of time (in s) is given by C1 + C2t + C3t2. Let C1 = 12.1 m, C2 = 14.9 m/s and C3 = -0.38 m/s2.



    I was able to solve the first question, which was asking for the velocity at T=11.0 seconds. However, I don't understand how to solve this part of the question:

    What is the particle's acceleration at time t = 11.0 s?

    I thought acceleration was a constant? I tried punching the constant into Lon-capa, but it said the answer was wrong.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 23, 2007 #2

    learningphysics

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    Yes, acceleration turns out to be constant. What number did you get for the acceleration?
     
  4. Aug 23, 2007 #3
    I got something like -.76 for my acceleration. However Lon-capa rejects it.
     
  5. Aug 23, 2007 #4

    learningphysics

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    Yeah, -0.76 is the right answer.

    Is the question exactly as you posted it?
     
  6. Aug 23, 2007 #5
    That's is the question.
     
  7. Aug 23, 2007 #6

    learningphysics

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    Hmmm... I'm not familiar with Lon-Capa... maybe something about the way you entered it? Did you enter it as -0.76 or -.76 ?

    Would that make a difference?

    I really don't know. :(
     
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