Isotope Stability

  • Thread starter mandy9008
  • Start date
  • #1
mandy9008
127
1

Homework Statement


Why is it important in brachytherapy to realize that rhodium is not a stable isotope? If rhodium were not a stable isotope, what considerations must one make?

I know that a stable isotope can go from one element to another, but I don't see how that would have anything to do with this problem.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
collinsmark
Homework Helper
Gold Member
3,169
1,927

Homework Statement


Why is it important in brachytherapy to realize that rhodium is not a stable isotope? If rhodium were not a stable isotope, what considerations must one make?

I know that a stable isotope can go from one element to another, but I don't see how that would have anything to do with this problem.
I think you mean an unstable isotope can likely change into another element via radioactive decay.

Anyway, When ruthenium 106Ru decays into rhodium 106Rh via beta decay, a certain amount of energy is released. You might consider this energy as being part of a radiation "dose."

But what happens to the leftover 106Rh? What's the half-life of 106Rh? Does anything happen to the 106Rh that might contribute to the total radiation dose? :wink:
 

Suggested for: Isotope Stability

  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
8K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
68K
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
3K
Top