Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

It feels horrible

  1. Dec 7, 2013 #1
    I just finished an online examination(on mechanics) and got the answer to a question 5 minutes after completing the exam. Feels so horrible, knowing that I could have got 97.5% instead of 86.5% had I got the idea during the exam. Has anybody ever had such an experience? If so, how do you cope with the depression that follows?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 7, 2013 #2

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I think it's quite common to either "get the question" after it's too late, or realize you wrote the wrong answer. There is no reason to get depressed. Just try to do better next time.
     
  4. Dec 7, 2013 #3
    If you stick with physics you'll end up doing much worse on exams than an 86%... I know a friend who took an exam where the average score was less than 30%.
     
  5. Dec 7, 2013 #4
    Guy 1: "Hey man, how'd you do on the exam?"
    Guy 2: "I got a seven.."
    Guy 1: "NICE!"
     
  6. Dec 7, 2013 #5

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    :rofl:

    Yeah, sarvesh0303, I hate to break it to you, but it will get worse. Falling on your face is part of a physics education.

    Buck up, sweetie - you can do it!
     
  7. Dec 7, 2013 #6

    BruceW

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    yeah, that's unlucky. And I think also, during the exam, the exam pressure has an effect on the brain, which means those ideas are suppressed. I don't know if this happens to everyone. But it definitely seems like I must be more prepared for an exam than I would need to be if there was no pressure attached to the exam.
     
  8. Dec 7, 2013 #7

    AlephZero

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    The standing joke about the Cambridge (UK) natural sciences tripos used to be: If you could only remember 5% of what the lecturers threw at you, you would fail. But if you could remember 10%, you got a first.

    But all this angst is just practice for the real world. Wait till you get to write a report justifying a $50m research project, and then realize you made a dumb mistake five minutes after you hit the "submit" button. Been there, done that!
     
  9. Dec 7, 2013 #8

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I was assigned to try to "win back" a multi-million dollar account that our office had lost. Even our VP was involved. I got a copy of the proposal, first paragraph, first page, were the words "I know you will agree that our rats are the best".

    They all had copies of this, they all read it, not one person noticed, not one. Apparently the client noticed. I don't think they liked our rats.
     
  10. Dec 7, 2013 #9

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

    Your company deals in selling domestic rats? I didn't know. So did you recover the contract in the end?

    I had one horrible email experience where I had several drafts that I never sent out but wanted to remove from the drafts folder and save for my records. So I emailed them to my account but forgot to remove the on-copy people. The responses I got back astonished me as one pain in the butt senior architect thought I was still working on some project that he had been killed off earlier. No amount of explanation helped and I got reprimanded severely for my simple mistake even though it was clear that it was sent by me to me and he was on-copy.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2013
  11. Dec 7, 2013 #10
    :bugeye:

    The importance of an E....
     
  12. Dec 7, 2013 #11

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    They had already signed a 3 year deal with the competition. I was too embarrassed to even contact them.
     
  13. Dec 7, 2013 #12

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    You said it "E". :biggrin:
     
  14. Dec 7, 2013 #13

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Perhaps this was a statement about upper management?
     
  15. Dec 7, 2013 #14

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    V50, you are THE BEST!!! You always crack me up. :approve:
     
  16. Dec 9, 2013 #15

    Curious3141

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    Well, it isn't "E"-zy running the rat race. :tongue2:
     
  17. Dec 9, 2013 #16

    D H

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Even more important, disable that stupid autocorrect whilst writing a proposal, and enable someone with a brain to read the proposal before submitting it.

    Rats!
     
  18. Dec 9, 2013 #17

    BruceW

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    lol, I think this post looks a lot harsher than you meant, D H.
     
  19. Dec 9, 2013 #18

    AlephZero

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    I just think some people here have more work experience than others.

    FWIW my favorite "engage brain before hitting send" was a rejection letter for a proposal, with the following two reasons:

    1. The proposed work was too ambitious and probability of success was too low.
    2. The proposed work had already been completed, and reported in the literature.

    Maybe there was a bug in the rejection-letter-generator app. It was only supposed to pick ONE option at random....
     
  20. Dec 9, 2013 #19

    jtbell

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I thought it was a reference to rats trained to gnaw on competitors' fiber optic cables.
     
  21. Dec 9, 2013 #20

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    DH is right, if more people were capable of proofreading, or able to see obvious mistakes, they wouldn't have so many problems. Sorry to relay more of my experiences, but due to the fact that I was known for my very annoying ability to "see the obvious", I was tasked with saving accounts that no one could fix. One was a large company that had not been getting the "rats" they were promised (all contracts were custom). This had been going on for almost three years and they had sent notice of lawsuit if we didn't give them a huge sum of money, which they calculated we owed them. Every month their contract codes would disappear from their account, causing huge over billing, they would complain to their account team which would request the billing department to issue manual credits and order that the contract codes be re-added. The company was on their fourth account team when they advised of the lawsuit.

    I was given a copy of the contract, and I looked into the billing system and sure enough, the contract codes kept disappearing. So I accessed the contract system and the contract had been accepted by legal and uploaded to the viewing system, but had never been loaded into the billing system, so to the billing system, the contract didn't exist, which was why the computer kept removing the manually added codes.

    This took me all of 30 minutes from the time I was handed the file. I made some calls and got the contract into the system. I then noticed that there were tons of credits added each month that seemed wrong. Sure enough, the account teams didn't understand the contract terms (in their defense, they were very complicated) and had actually given the customer too many credits over the years, the customer owed *US* money.

    On the conference call with the CFO of that company to go over my findings, he actually broke into tears, his company was facing bankruptcy and this could cause him to lose his job, we were talking about a LOT of money. It didn't go well, they did end up in bankruptcy (not our fault). I was teased for a long time "you made a customer cry".
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: It feels horrible
  1. Feeling (Replies: 38)

  2. Gah, this is horrible (Replies: 32)

  3. I feel horrible. (Replies: 17)

  4. Horrible TV Marathons (Replies: 27)

Loading...