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It is not possible to accomplish an objective, ever.

  1. Sep 11, 2005 #1
    you hear it all the time: what are your objectives?-- The objective is to... --We accomplished our objective.--To succeed in life, you have to set goals/objectives. --We failed to accomplish our objectives.

    It is not possible to 'do' an objective. It is possible for an individual to attain 'objectivity', and to 'be' objective. And, the only way to attain objectivity and to be objective was to NOT intend to do any subjective, ever.

    Right intent is only at the start of objectivity. Objectivity does not have a back 'end', only a beginning. Either an individual has attained objectivity and is able to see all things (Right perception) as they truly are without interference, or that individual is subjective.

    It is possible for an individual to intend to do a subjective and to accomplish a subjective, but, at the point of intending to 'do' a subjective, that individual's objectivity went out the window.

    The point I refer from is not-action. Thought is action. Not-action, or 'non-action', rules all action.

    I say it is not possible to fail.

    What do you say?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2005 #2

    cronxeh

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    Failure is the default state, and by state you imply the existence of objective. The objective itself is relative because it will inevitably lead back to failure - whether you succeed or not, thus it has no bearing on the purpose. The purpose is not the objective, because if you knew the purpose you would not have an objective - the purpose would include a revelation of itself as well as the failure and an objective by which you would attain it.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2005 #3
    Failure WAS the default state, in the low bandwidth domain. Here in the high bandwidth domain, objectivity IS the default state, and is not relative and it does not move.

    Being objective is being isolated from all things. Attaining objectivity was only possible because i constantly consciously concentrated to not do any subjective. Thus, i became I.

    There is not a purpose, and I do not have an objective. It is not possible to have an objective. So, while it was not possible to fail, it also was not possible to succeed.

    A subjective was an intent to do any action only THEN. It is possible to intend to do a subjective NOW. It is not possible to do a subjective now. It is possible to see the effect of a subjective NOW.

    Its about knowing the difference between that which is, and that which was.
    That which was (i/self/point being referred to/thought/action), was an illusion. That which is, (I/other-than-self/point being referred from/not thought/not action), is what it is, unto itself. Is is inside I. Was was outside I and is outside I.

    It may appear that that which was was coming from me, but in reality, it was only coming through me. Illusion was i believed that that which was was coming FROM me. I began when i accepted the truth that that which was was coming THROUGH me.

    And yes, only revelation made it possible for i to become I. Aside from Right intent, i had nothing to do with becoming I.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2005 #4

    hypnagogue

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    "Objective," when used as a noun, can be used as another word for a goal. So to say one wants to accomplish an objective is just to say one wants to attain a goal. There is nothing deep here about attaining objectivity or being objective. There is also no noun form of the word "subjective," so it doesn't even make sense to talk about doing a subjective. There doesn't seem to be much here but confused and confusing language.
     
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