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It's Bobbie Burns Night

  1. Jan 25, 2005 #1

    selfAdjoint

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    January the 25th that is. And I have a bit of scotch to sip, but I do not have a Haggis. Ah well, we can remember Burns too with his poetry and song:

    Is there for honest poverty
    That hings his heid an aa that?
    The couard slave we pass him by,
    We daur be puir for aa that
    For aa that an aa that
    The rank is but the guinea-stamp
    The man's the gowd for aa that

    Whit though on homely fare we dine
    Wear hodden gray an aa that
    Gie fules their silks and knaves their wine
    A man's a man for aa that
    For aa that an aa that
    Their tinsel show an aa that
    The honest man though e'er so puir
    Is king o men for aa that

    Ye see yon birkie caad a laird
    Wha struts an stares and aa that
    Though hunders worship at his word
    He's but a cuif for aa that
    For aa that an aa that
    His riband star an aa that
    The man o independent mind
    He looks an lauchs at aa that

    A prince can make a beltit knight
    A marquis, duke an aa that
    But an honest man' abune his might
    Guid faith, he maunna faa that
    For aa that an aa that
    Their dignities an aa that
    The pith o sense an pride o worth
    Are higher rank than aa that

    Then lat us pray that come it may
    As come it will for aa that
    That sense an worth ower aa the earth
    Sall bear the gree an aa that
    For aa that an aa that
    It's comin yet for aa that
    That man tae man the hale warl ower
    Sall brither be for aa that.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 25, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

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    Just a bit of scotch, huh? I'm sure I hear a definite slur in your singing already. Okay, pass the bottle. Oh, wait, I still have to drive home. Give me 20 minutes...oh, wait, you'll have finished the bottle by then. Hmm...guess I'll have to pick up my own bottle on the way home. I forgot, I don't like scotch, and the thought of Haggis scares me (sounds like a Fear Factor meal). Oh, I know, I'll have some shortbread, that's good and Scottish. :biggrin:

    Now, who is Robbie Burns?
     
  4. Jan 26, 2005 #3

    Gokul43201

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    Burns is the Scottish poet who wrote Auld Lang Syne. There's another one I know, but can't seem to recall... :grumpy:
     
  5. Jan 26, 2005 #4

    Moonbear

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    Oh! Hmm...that's the one that goes, "When old acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind, la la la la la la la la lala lala la la la, and that's the Auld Lang Syne!" It starts making more sense after a bottle or two of scotch, right? :rofl:
     
  6. Jan 26, 2005 #5

    matthyaouw

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    Damn, I forgot Burns night :(
    I guess I'll have to pick up some haggis next week & celebrate late. Luckily I still have a little drop of Bowmore left over from Christmas.
     
  7. Jan 26, 2005 #6

    selfAdjoint

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    Here's a recipe for Haggis:

    (Found at smartnet, via google)

    "Lights" in the above means lungs. USDA won't let sheep lungs be sold for human consumption. Grinches!
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2005
  8. Jan 26, 2005 #7
    :confused: Isn't that the definition of NOT knowing?
     
  9. Jan 26, 2005 #8

    selfAdjoint

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    Bowmore's pretty fine. I am currently on Speybourne; it' s cheap and very tasty (if you are a single malt fan. Like haggis that's an acquired taste! :yuck: )
     
  10. Jan 27, 2005 #9

    matthyaouw

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    Agreed, Bowmore is lovely. I'm a real fan of the Islay malts (Bowmore, Laphroaig, Lagavullin, Caol Iila (sp?) Bunnahabhain (sp? again. My Gaelic isn't too great) to name a few). I may have to try some Speybourne at some point. Its a shame that the pubs and clubs I visit stock only the generic brands, as I could really do to sample a few more. Tell me, what sort of range of whiskies do you get in the States? I'd imagine you have more of the Tennesee & Kentucky ones than I am able to get here (England). What sort of range of scotches do you have?
     
  11. Jan 27, 2005 #10
    This is America, we have everything currently available on Earth. jk, Actually, in bars you don't get a huge selection. I'm not much of a drinker, but from what I can see selection depends on the tastes of the bar owner. If he's a scotch drinker there will be a big selection of scotch, but I don't see that often. For the most part I see a lot of blended scotches and very very few single malts. My experience with single malts comes from a sampler pack with a dozen mini bottles I got as a gift. Amazing how different scotch can be from brand to brand.
     
  12. Jan 27, 2005 #11

    Gokul43201

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    Close enough.

    I do vaguely remember something about a 'friend' and a strongly religious context, but nothing more. I tried a Google search just after posting and found two poems involving a 'friend', but it was neither of them. Later I found he'd written several poems about 'friends', so I gave up.
     
  13. Jan 27, 2005 #12

    Astronuc

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    Laphroaig and Lagavullin are great. Bunnahabhain, Caol Ila are right.
    Check out ( http://www.islaywhiskysociety.com/ ).

    I also enjoy McCallan 18-25 years.

    But my favorite is Glenmorangie from the shores of Dornoch Firth.

    One can get any variety of Whisky from around the world. Unfortunately Glenlivet (:yuck:) and Glenfiddich (:yuck:) are all too common.

    I occassionally drink Johnny Walker Black, which is OK as blends go. While in Japan and flying back on Northwest Airlines, I had Suntory Black, which was very good. The poor guys in Japan had a hard time with me. They served the Whisky diluted and on ice (which is customary). I returned it and asked for straight, no ice. I got it back without the ice, but still diluted. Finally, on the second time, I got a glass of straight unadulterated Whisky. They were amazed that anyone would drink it straight.

    As for the Tennessee or Kentucky whiskies, you are probably referring to bourbons. I can't say much there, other than I don't really like bourbon.

    I much prefer single malt scotch and Hebridean whisky liqueurs (http://www.hebridean.net/).

    =====================================================
    As for Robert Burns - try

    Selected Poetry of Robert Burns (1759-1796)

    http://www.burnshowffclub.org/ - That's howff club.

    http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/ - commercial stuff of a Scottish nature
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2005
  14. Jan 28, 2005 #13

    matthyaouw

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    I think once saw a McCallan (25 yrs) in a rather nice but somewhat overpriced country pub. £8.50 a glass... It damn well better be good ;)

    Actually, slightly diluted whisky can be quite nice. The water in the Scottish highlands is quite destinctive in flavour (and colour...) and can compliment a whisky quite well. It takes the edge off it a little, and can bring out some of the more delicate flavours and aromas. I've tried it with good old transparent English water, but sadly it is not quite the same.

    Whisky fact: Whisky only 'ages' while in its original cask. It matures with its contact with the wood of the cask, and as it gradually evapourates from the sealed cask. The portion which evoaporates is known as the 'angel's share'. The longer it remains in its cask, the larger the angel's share, which is one reason an old whisky costs so much. Next time you meet someone who boasts that they have kept a bottle of scotch in the cupboard for 40 years to improve its quality, you can tell them why they are wasting their time. :biggrin:
     
  15. Jan 28, 2005 #14

    Astronuc

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    Yeah, McCallan is d@*# good, and that glass is overpriced! The prices are even worse in Tokyo.

    Like anything, it is an acquired taste. Try Glenmorangie.

    Some years are better than others. A serious connoisseur should do a taste test at distributor, or go to the particular distillery, and do a taste test there.
     
  16. Jan 28, 2005 #15

    selfAdjoint

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    I like Islay whiskies too. I remember Laphroaiag when it was new in the US, before the price went up. What do all you think about Oban?
     
  17. Jan 28, 2005 #16
    Oban was one of the ones I remember, actually the only one I remember in my variety pack. Now if I could only remember what it tasted like. Was it the one with the peat taste or the salty seaweed taste or the burnt taste?
     
  18. Jan 28, 2005 #17

    Gokul43201

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    Speaking of Japan...

    I drank a lot of shochu (the Japanese version of scotch - distilled from barley and rice and sometimes, sweet potato or chestnut) this holiday season. I found it quite interesting. Very smooth, and does not require warming up ! :approve:

    Astro, have you tried any, or are you a purist, like SA and Matt ?
     
  19. Jan 28, 2005 #18

    selfAdjoint

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    I would say peat - smoky. It's not an Islay, nor yet a Speymouth, but a Highland malt. But I find most of them, including literary fave Glenlivet, to be nearly tasteless. All bite and no caress, if you know what I mean.
     
  20. Jan 28, 2005 #19

    Moonbear

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    Ooh, you're such a smooth talker when you get a little scotch in you! :!!)
    :biggrin:

    Unfortunately, I had a bad experience involving tequila and cheap whiskey that has given me one heck of a conditioned taste aversion. Even a whiff of scotch or bourbon (literally, just the smell of it) induces nausea. Let this be a warning, never ever drink cheap alcohol! I ruined my taste buds before ever giving the good stuff a chance. :frown:
     
  21. Jan 29, 2005 #20
    I tried one of those stupid birthday stunts when I turned 18. 18shots of tequila in about 30 minutes. I remember eating cake, standing up and that's about it. I guess I passed out, threw up all over, was driven home and carried to my bed, parents woke up and carried me to bathroom. It took about 15 years til I could drink tequila without getting sick.
     
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