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Jackson Question

  1. Jun 26, 2009 #1
    Can someone explain to me how Jackson, on page 42 of the 3rd ed. of Classical Electrodynamics, when he is deriving the interaction energy [tex]W_{int}[/tex] in his example involving two point charges, gets from equation (1.57) to (1.58). I thought about typing up the TeX but I'm sure most of you have this book. I know he makes that substitution he mentions but I'm not sure how to go about doing that. Help!
     
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  3. Jun 26, 2009 #2

    Born2bwire

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    I keep my copy of Jackson at the office and not at home. I do not need him to pervade my life any more than is possible.
     
  4. Jun 27, 2009 #3

    Redbelly98

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    Some of us are old and have earlier editions of Jackson. Presumably the equation numbering is different.
     
  5. Jun 27, 2009 #4

    gabbagabbahey

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    It's just a straight substitution: Solve for [itex]\mathbf{x}[/itex] in terms of [itex]\mathbf{\rho}[/itex], and substitute. If you get stuck, post your work and we'll be able to help you better.
     
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