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Japanese underwater pyramids

  1. Jun 27, 2005 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 27, 2005 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    The last that I heard, the one Japanese scientist is convinced that they're artificial, and the majority of the experts are convinced that this is a natural formation characterstic of this particular type of stone.
     
  4. Jun 27, 2005 #3
    They look man made in so far as the lines are pretty straight, and the surfaces pretty flat. In one picture the three "steps" look to be of the same dimensions, but in all the other pictures the steps are all different dimensions, which would be odd in a man made structure.

    It would be nicer to have an overall view, because the individual detail views don't look like they'd add up to a general pyramid shape.

    If it is man made, it looks to me like it wasn't finished before it sunk.
     
  5. Jul 19, 2005 #4
    re

    if they are natural, can anyone explain what forces were at work here.
     
  6. Jul 20, 2005 #5
    They look like man made to me..
     
  7. Jul 20, 2005 #6

    Ivan Seeking

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    Apparently this type of rock forms in layers that break off in even sheets with erosion.
     
  8. Jul 20, 2005 #7
    I just got back from the Grand Canyon- there were all sorts of natural rock formations that looked eerily man-made with nearly perfect lines due to the atomic structure of the rock
     
  9. Jul 20, 2005 #8

    matthyaouw

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    Many bizzare rock formations are possible purely naturally. I can't for the life of me remember the name of the phenomenon (poly[something] cementing i think), but in my university's rock samples I have seen lumps of sandstone that look like a series of cubes superimposed onto each other, with smoothed sides and perfect right angle corners. They look carved, though they are a concequence of mineral cements. I will try to get pictures and information on these when the new semester starts. I would not have thought such things able to form naturally had i not seen these myself, so I don't believe that saying something doesn't 'look' natural is acceptable reasoning here.
    It would take hard evidence of human habitation/work to convince me that they are not natural.
     
  10. Jul 20, 2005 #9
    The unusual mineral explanation is almost certainly the right one here, but some one would have to test it by bringing some of this rock up and seeing if it fractures on clean lines, leaving clean planes.
     
  11. Jul 20, 2005 #10
    I can assume that the rocks are basalt. There is a feature in that area called the Okinawa Trough. Its a transition zone between the Philippine and the Euro-Asian plates.
    The basalt there is completely different{as are many aspects of the lithosphere} then that found on either plate.

    natural shape of basalt

    The hexagon shape of basalt is natural and occurs when the magma is cooling. Its not a far fetched idea, that other shapes can occure naturally too. More so in a area that has such unique features.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2005
  12. Aug 1, 2005 #11
    Does anyone here think that the Japanese underwater Pyramids have a connection to the ancient Egyptian Pyramids? Please prove some facts for this answer. Thanx
     
  13. Aug 2, 2005 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    Hi snipero1,
    We would have to know if they are natural or artificial before speculating about any connection to Egypt. And its seems that they are probably natural formations.
     
  14. Aug 2, 2005 #13
    well i believe that they are man-made most definately, as they contain such structures as entrances, stairways and the floor plan is veyr similar to that of the Shuri Castle. There is an actual floor plan drawn out on a website, not sure which one. Also i found the following information

    "That first sighting was equivocal - a provocative, squared structure, so encrusted with coral that its manmade identity was uncertain. Then, as recently as the summer of 1996, a sports diver accidentally discovered a huge, angular platform about 40 feet below the surface, off the southwestern shore of Okinawa. The feature’s artificial provenance was beyond question."

    http://www.cyberspaceorbit.com/phikent/japan/japan2.html

    im pretty sure thats the website... if not then just reply back

    As well as that there is the Okinawa Rosetta Stone. The stone talks about a peaceful ruler and his castle on land, which after the occurrence of a catastrophic event, ended up under the waves. The occurrence of this disaster has not been dated yet, so no exact estimate can be made about the end of this culture, and wether it collided with any other cultures such as Egypt. As well as that, the picture on the Stone, of the structure resembles a lot of the structures that are found underwater.
     
  15. Aug 2, 2005 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    The only new statement that caught my attention was that no debris is found that would suggest a natural shelving process. Wouldn't the ocean currents explain this? In either case, if some correlation between these objects and the Egyptian pyramids was demonstrated, I guess that could serve to support the case for being artificial.

    The Okinawa stone sounds interesting. I had never heard of it.
     
  16. Aug 3, 2005 #15

    Integral

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    Given the about 5000 year and perhaps 5000mi separation from the Egyptian pyramids, even if they are man made, it seems pretty unlikely that they could be related.

    I lean to a natural cause, the pics show in the 3 links just did not add up to a man made structure. Sure there are straight lines and planar surfaces, but there are also bizarre discontinuities that seem to serve no purpose, nor are the breaks ornamental, they appear to be random works of nature. In nature crystal planes and shapes are to be expected.
     
  17. Aug 3, 2005 #16
    Good observation. Well put: "...discontinuities that seem to serve no purpose..." Earlier I said if it were man made it must have been unfinished, but really, the "discontinuities" aren't what you'd expect from something that is merely "unfinished". They do appear to be quite purposless.
     
  18. Aug 3, 2005 #17

    matthyaouw

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    Looking at the pictures here http://www.cyberspaceorbit.com/phikent/japan/japan2.html , I notice 3 things.

    1- I see no joins to indicate rocks have been shaped and placed there. If it is man made, it seems to have all been carved out of one outcrop. I'm not aware of any structures on this scale that have been made like that.

    2- Nothing seems to be on the right scale for humans. If the broad flat areas were designed to be acessed and used by people, I would imagine that steps would be present. The only things resembling steps seem 3 or 4 feet high each.

    3- The picture on the right at the top does seem to show some nice straight edges, and right angles, but it merges into normal looking rough rock faces in the top left and bottom right of the picture, which suggests a natural formation to me.
     
  19. Aug 3, 2005 #18

    matthyaouw

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    http://www.crystalinks.com/below.html
    More pictures here. There is a sketch drawing of the entire 'structure' about a quarter of the way down. The whole thing looks random and unplanned to me.

    The 'post holes' intrigue me, though they could be natural too. Some marine creatures bore holes into rock.

    The curved structure here is interesting too: http://www.lauralee.com/japan/japan_13.htm
    (from- http://www.lauralee.com/japan.htm )
    The article mentions hexagonal columns, which leads me to think about columnular jointing, a feature quite common in basalt.

    I found a usenet discussion in which a geologist offers explanations of some of the features (not all of the pictures work unfortunately) http://www.ramtops.co.uk/yonaguni.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2005
  20. Aug 4, 2005 #19
    Heh that geologist is a fun read, thanks Matthyaouw.
     
  21. Aug 9, 2005 #20

    matthyaouw

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    Take a look at this. The corners and platforms aren't as neat, but that's probably because its actively eroded still, being extremely near the shoreline on an exposed headland where conditions are often stormy. There are still plenty of almost perfect right angles, and a few platforms.

    http://www.bathgatecc.org.uk/gallery/mark/neistpoint.jpg
    http://www.coolpics.co.uk/images/skye04/niest/page_2.html

    That's Neist point, on the Isle of Skye, Scotland. It's made of basalt flows and basic sills, with sediments in between. I couldn't tell you for certain what outcrops at the shore, but if I remember correctly it is basalt.
     
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