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Jessica Watson's homecoming

  1. Jun 6, 2010 #1
    I am not sure if her amazing solo sail around the world has been discussed here on PF before. She is a lovely sweet girl who is back home now after circumnavigating the globe alone. At her reception at the Sydney's harbor, She objects to the Australian Prime Minister for calling her a 'hero'!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yapmL5xJfHU&feature=related
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UE1SgS767WY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c59VxItEUio&feature=related

    http://www.jessicawatson.com.au/about-jessica
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2010 #2
    No way in hell would I let my daughter sail around the world alone. Her parents are out of her mind. The sea is an incredibly dangerous place, not for an inexperienced young girl. Even experienced boat pilots can easily get killed.
     
  4. Jun 6, 2010 #3

    russ_watters

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    This is a pretty new fad apparently and will only end when one of these kids gets killed.
     
  5. Jun 6, 2010 #4
    was she ever truly alone, or did she have escorts ?
     
  6. Jun 6, 2010 #5
    I kinda have the same question as in her You tube video diaries she often uses the term "We" as opposed to"I"?
     
  7. Jun 6, 2010 #6

    Evo

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    She failed at her goal of circumnavigating the world.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2010
  8. Jun 6, 2010 #7
    On her website, it says "...Throughout her journey, Jessica's progress has been closely and accurately monitored by family, support crew and rescue authorities around the world using TracPlus (www.tracplus.com)"
    http://www.jessicawatson.com.au/the-voyage
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2010
  9. Jun 6, 2010 #8

    Evo

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  10. Jun 7, 2010 #9
    I don't think I understand the "hero" angle.
     
  11. Jun 7, 2010 #10
    Well, considering her young age, inexperience and a journey fraught with danger, The wiki Pedia mentions she had had over 10,000 nautical miles training/experience. However that doesn't mean a teenager her age should dare to cross the treacherous oceans on her own. Since it's clear to me that she has been escorted or closely followed by rescue teams, I find it unfair to call her or her parents 'stupid'. Yes, that would have been stupid if she was left all alone...!

    And SHE DID NOT Fail as she traveled over 19,631 nm! though the World Sailing Speed Record Council (WSSRC) only recognizes a minimum distance of 21,600 nm and 18 years of age for the competitor, so such an accomplishment is not equal to 'fail'!

    Speaking of 'stupid', I have seen many stupid dangerous acts in the supposedly funny vidoes on AFV, so doing stupid things is pretty much the norm in America:smile:
     
  12. Jun 7, 2010 #11
    Yeah, I wouldn't call her a 'hero' or anything like that because actually I never believe in the notion of a 'hero' whatsoever. But it's good to hear she objects to the PM's remark.
     
  13. Jun 7, 2010 #12

    Gokul43201

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    Actually, she did not fail at meeting the criteria for unaided solo circumnavigation because of not being "alone", but because of mileage logged (at least if you go by WSSRC rules). Irrespective, it's a tremendous feat.

    http://www.sail-world.com/USA/Lies,-Damn-Lies,-and-PR-Spin/69252
     
  14. Jun 7, 2010 #13

    Evo

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    That's exactly what I said "She failed. Also she was surrounded by support boats". Then I gave the link showing why she failed.

    This is a fad right now where teens are trying to get the "youngest to sail around the world" recognition. The Dutch courts recently prevented a young girl from making an attempt.

    And Desiree, you're correct, lots of kids get injured and killed from stupid stunts, but they aren't encouraged by news coverage and praise from adults for doing it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
  15. Jun 8, 2010 #14
    Evo, would you quantify "surrounded by support boats"? (By the way, I've seen the route she took, she succeeded in sailing "around the planet". Odd that you call it a failure based on the rules of some organisation which has discontinued that record category and anyway would have discriminated against her on the basis of age.)

    Why the hate? So many billions of people in the world, and you think it stupid that a negligibly tiny handful of the very best resourced/financed choose to try something inspirational? Better to imprison everyone in cotton wool so they encounter no adversity until the moment they turn, what is the arbitrary age of legal adulthood in your particular country, 21? That's sure to contribute to developing the kind of society we would want to live in..
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  16. Jun 8, 2010 #15

    DaveC426913

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    I wish to dispute this definition of sailing alone.

    Did she receive assistance from these support boats, or did they simply monitor her?
    And how, if she was surrounded by support boats, was it stupid? The worst that could have happened is the same thing that could have happened on any ocean-going sailing trip. Or do you think she should not sail at all?
     
  17. Jun 8, 2010 #16

    Evo

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    If you knew the background, you'd know she was trying to beat an 18 year old male that had successfully met the criteria. She failed. That's not my decision, but the decision of the organisation who's record she wished to obtain.
     
  18. Jun 8, 2010 #17

    russ_watters

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    Yes. Their presence is assistance. Even if she never recieves any assistance of any kind (difficult to believe) from the support boats, their presence absolutely changes the equation. The danger inherrent in the attempt is part and parcel of what makes it a challenge. Ie, you can take risks you wouldn't otherwise take if you know you have a safety net.....which makes a good literal example of the same thing: I'd certainly try tightrope walking...but not without a net.
     
  19. Jun 8, 2010 #18

    russ_watters

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    Parents who selfishly risk their own kids' lives irritate me.
     
  20. Jun 8, 2010 #19

    russ_watters

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    What is your criteria for success? The title of her website is "youngest person to sail solo and unassisted around the world"....so who gets to set the criteria for that? Does she set her own criteria?

    The only way to judge success or failure is to set well-defined and publicly recognized criteria and see if she met it or didn't. Since her website references the record holder Evo referrs to, it would seem that that would be the criteria.
     
  21. Jun 8, 2010 #20

    DaveC426913

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    This is a bit judgemental. You don't know it was the parents driving it and you don't know it was selfish.

    I had a 16 year old who was bound and determined to fly across the country alone. I had to weigh the odds of the risk versus the damage that might have been caused by vetoing him.

    Raising well-adjusted kids is weighing risks.
     
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