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Jogging program?

  1. Feb 24, 2007 #1
    I looking to start jogging from a beginner level. I have done sports and jogging in the past but not recently and a bit overweight. Is someone on a program or have been on one and found it to be worthwhile? I am looking for a 12+ week program although a number of smaller programs that build from each other would also be good.
     
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  3. Feb 24, 2007 #2
    This website is good in general.

    http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/index.shtml

    I used to have a jogging blog on there to keep track of my runs... but then I stopped running :-( (Too cold to run up here in Canada right now and I despise my treadmill.)


    What would you want to do with the 12 week program? How fast can you run/jog a mile now?
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2007
  4. Feb 24, 2007 #3
    To share what I did when I started out. I just kept testing the waters to see how far I could run ( I preferred distance to speed and usually was at an abysmal ~11min mile pace or something, but I would jog 10+ miles so it wasn't bad.

    Once I kinda figured out where my comfort zone was speed/distance wise I make a four week program where I would run a few long distance runs and one speed run where I wouldn't run as far. I kinda liked it, was a relaxed training schedule. Then every few weeks I would go out and test the waters again and see if I could add another mile or two.

    If you are looking for a really rigorous training plan, the people on the cool running forum are ussually talking about good ones.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2007
  5. Feb 24, 2007 #4

    Moonbear

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    Just thinking about jogging makes my knees hurt. :yuck: I wonder how many more knee replacements are needed in this generation due to all the people out jogging. I'd highly recommend something with less impact if you want a cardio workout, especially if you're starting out overweight (I won't pry and ask how much...some people think 5 lbs extra is overweight and others don't think they're overweight until they have 50 lbs to lose...if you're on the lower end of the scale, the weight isn't much of an issue, but if you've gained a lot since you last went jogging, you might want to be more cautious starting out).
     
  6. Feb 24, 2007 #5
    The only jogging program I want to contemplate - even so much as watching - is the London Marathon.:smile:

    Running's better anyway and less impact.Cycling is also excellent in this regard, swimming IMO is better still, although it's more of an all over work out if you vary your strokes, one of the best forms of exercise, both in being low impact and a good cardio-vascular work out. Oh and the extra fat makes you more bouyant too :smile:
     
  7. Feb 24, 2007 #6
    I don't think I'd run or jog even if my life depended on it. I'd rather diet than toture myself with long cardio sessions. I'd look into beginner's weight training with very very mild cardio ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2007
  8. Feb 24, 2007 #7

    George Jones

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    I started working out three weeks ago, and I just make up my own programme. Having a fitness room at work helps.

    I estimate (no scales) that I've put on at least 10 pounds in the last year. I'm trying to get back to my pre-pregnancy weight.
     
  9. Feb 24, 2007 #8

    Ivan Seeking

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    :bugeye: :uhh: Did you have a rough pregnancy?
     
  10. Feb 24, 2007 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was a five-mile a day guy for years, and jogging did in what was left of my knees and back. Now there are times when my knees hurt just trying to walk the three-hundred feet up the hill from the office to the house.
     
  11. Feb 24, 2007 #10

    radou

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    As George mentioned, it's best for you to create your own programme! If you can't force yourself to do that, then try attending a jogging programme.
     
  12. Feb 24, 2007 #11
    What's the reason for not liking running? Is it the knees? Its damaging to the shin muscles as well.
     
  13. Feb 24, 2007 #12
    That's good insight. I might not try running afterall. The other thing is when one exercises a lot, one's appetite increases so at the end of the day you may not have become healthier.
     
  14. Feb 24, 2007 #13
    I use to cycle 40min twice, one in the morning and one in the afternoon to go to uni for 5 times a week. After some weeks, my shin muscles started to hurt just by resting and the it wasn't good for the knees either. However, had I ran for this amount each day, the damage would have been worse.

    I have tried swimming but unfortunately I can only swim one stroke, free style and the strokes are not very efficient since I only learnt it when I was 15 so my back tend to hurt after a while. Mybe it's due to the turning around at the ends.
     
  15. Feb 24, 2007 #14

    radou

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    Forget about running because of diets and similar mumbo jumbo. I mean, it's a great side effect, but the point is that you actually feel better after running (a balanced jogging session, of course, no overdoing), and I believe that there is a strong relation between physical and psychical activity, defined in a positive sense, of course.
     
  16. Feb 24, 2007 #15
    Yeah, I was also about to say that what running brings you, is larger lung capacity or so it feels. More ability to sit down or more want to sit down and study. Whereas if you haven't excercised, you feel like standing up and move which means less concentration. I like to get this effect of running but without the negative side effects of injury. The best prevention I could do is probably to decrease my weight (by less intake and more energy output) so there is less impact on my knee. But it's hard to do especially while studying with all the stress.
     
  17. Feb 24, 2007 #16
    I'm lazy when it comes to that type of conditioning. I'd much rather work at maximum intensity with clean and jerks or power cleans etc than jog for a half hour.

    I do however like elliptical and arc trainers. They are somewhat fun (for cardio related stuff) and have much less impact. I have a bad L5 disk and so-so joints from heavy lifting, and the elliptical trainers do not bother my knees, ankles, or lower back! Stairmasters are also fun.

    Once you've adapted and are confident with using the equipment and your wind has improved, move onto interval training with periods of higher intensity (15 to 60 seconds), and then back off for some other interval of time.

    Moderation is key. Don't go too crazy at first otherwise you'll either get burnt out, or the intial rapid weight loss will hault after a few weeks and losing the last few pounds will be increasingly difficult. If you take it easy at first--avoiding a hardcore diet and lengthy cardio sessions, you'll be much better off in the long run.
     
  18. Feb 24, 2007 #17

    radou

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    Yes, I agree it's hard, but look at it from the other side - push aside the fact that it's hard and replace it with the fact that it's essential, since running will for sure help you to release/get rid of a considerable amount of stress.

    If you don't feel like running, take a walk. People often underestimate walking - it's very healthy, too (specially if you're near the countryside). Of course, you can combine walking and running, that's actually what I do.
     
  19. Feb 24, 2007 #18

    I like the word essential especially if you want to optimise your study. Maybe the best approach is to eat less (i.e. subway for dinner) and run 3 times a week. I am overwieght by about 10kg.
     
  20. Feb 24, 2007 #19

    Chi Meson

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    Grr.

    Will all of you non-runners out there just log off?

    ('Cept you Moonb, you just take an ibuprofin:rolleyes: )

    I'm 42, have been running (NOT "jogging") for 35 years. Have done 4 marathons and countless 10Ks, 10 milers, 1/2 marathons, triathlons, etc.

    NO knee problems. NO shin problems. I had a little bit of an inflamed achilles last year, but 4 (count them four!) visits to a physical therapist, and a special new stretch, and that problem's gone.

    To the OP.

    You don't need a 12 -week program unless you want to progress quickly enough to compete within 3 months. Just run. Buy good shoes ($100 to start) from a RUNNING store. Start out easy. One mile, slow. Don't try to be Rocky ar anything. If you get winded, slow down but don't stop. Make sure you do it at least four times a week. Its hardest to get started, but once you get going, it's great. Keep it fun.




    Now if you excuse me, I'm going to bed. I'm running the Hyannis 1/2 marathon tomorrow morning.
     
  21. Feb 24, 2007 #20
    I think running is only hard on your knees if you are on the sidewalk. The asphalt on the road supposed to be pretty good. You will also want to invest in shoes specifically for running and stuff. But you probably already know this stuff.

    Just make sure not to overdo it. I remember I went way too far one day and my knee reallly hurt for like a week. :cool:

    We have some bike paths over here that are just great for running.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2007
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