1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Engineering Journeyman Electrician to EET

  1. Dec 11, 2017 #1
    I am an Electrician of 14 years, now in a management position with great experience. I am looking at taking a part time study 3 year course through S.A.I.T that will allow me to get my Electrical engineering technology Diploma in 3 years all while working full-time in the city. This will permit me to eventually register as a C.E.T followed by P. Tech. and a P.L.(Eng) with APEGA.

    Is this move realistic to open doors for me or is this a pipe dream? Has anyone else made this move?

    Any input is appreciated.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 11, 2017 #2

    CalcNerd

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    .
    I understand the C.E.T. but what are the other credentials? Canadian?
    .
    If they are similar to the requirements for Engineering licensure in the US, an EET program can allow you to pursue a P.E. after 8 years of experience (vs four with an EE degree). However, I don't want to speculate as I am inferring this only from your above post and comparing to the US system.
     
  4. Dec 11, 2017 #3
    These are in fact Canadian credentials. I don't suppose these are Canadian threads are they? The P. Tech is Professional Technologist following C.E.T. The P.L.Eng (Professional Licensed Engineer) allows a technologist to register as an engineer with the canadian governing body. This is not the same as Professional engineer however a P.L.Eng is allowed to practice engineering in Canada.
     
  5. Dec 11, 2017 #4

    CalcNerd

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    From my limited interaction with a P.L.E. from Quebec, the US and Canadian programs are similar.
    .
    In the US, an EET program is considered less rigorous and therefore requires more time (8 years) working under a licensed engineer vs an EE graduate (four year requirement).
    .
    Unfortunately, you may not have any real options and move forward with the EET program.
    .
    Coincidentally, I was in an EET program (while working as an Electrician/instrument tech) and had some excellent classes equal to EE coursework. And I had some EET courses that weren't. None of my EET coursework ever counted towards my educational requirements that were analyzed for ABET equivalency. Just a bit of info for you to consider. To summarize, if you have a choice between EE and EET, choose EE if you can handle the extra work and effort. The extra work required for the EE will be rewarded in requiring less time to apply for your P.L.E..
     
  6. Dec 12, 2017 #5

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    It certainly isn't a pipe dream, but whether it is a good idea depends on what you want to achieve with it. You said you are in a management position -- that's pretty far to go without a license so it suggests you are on a career path that doesn't require one. This means that in order to get on a path that requires one (or one is helpful), it will likely be a different path. So: what career path are you on now and what path are you considering where you think it might benefit you?

    I'm currently struggling with a similar decision regarding an MBA...
     
  7. Dec 17, 2017 #6
    It is not clear from the discussion but I assume you are considering a 4-year BSEET and not a 2-year AS EET degree. My advice is to make the attempt to pursue the EET. Ultimately, it will refine some of your knowledge and perhaps open doors that are now welded shut without some type of degree.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted