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JSF F-35B Tests

  1. Oct 18, 2006 #1

    Astronuc

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    This was sent to me -

     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    Jeez, Astro... I wanna trade mailing lists with you. All that anybody sends me is real estate fliers and credit card applications. :grumpy:

    I couldn't help noticing in that last clip that the rear duct is oscillating laterally. Is that a stabilization response, or did someone forget a lock washer in the shop?
     
  4. Oct 20, 2006 #3

    FredGarvin

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    Damn work firewall...
     
  5. Oct 20, 2006 #4
    Let me just say that the F-35 is freakin' awesome. First video footage I've seen of it--thanks Astro.
     
  6. Nov 6, 2006 #5
    great footage.... but why doesn't someone send similar stuff to my email account....
     
  7. Nov 6, 2006 #6

    NoTime

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    I'd say a good example of fly by wire output :smile:
    Normal control surfaces won't work.

    Think of balancing on a stick.
     
  8. Nov 6, 2006 #7

    Danger

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    I quit thinking about stuff like that when I moved in with W. :tongue:
     
  9. Nov 7, 2006 #8

    LURCH

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    Geeze; don't you know anything about airplanes?:rolleyes: That means it's happy!:approve:
     
  10. Nov 7, 2006 #9

    Danger

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
  11. Nov 7, 2006 #10

    turbo

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    Just be sure to wear asbestos gloves if you want to scratch its belly.
     
  12. Nov 7, 2006 #11

    Danger

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    Dammit... is everybody after my badge now? :grumpy:


    :biggrin:
     
  13. Nov 12, 2006 #12
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2006
  14. Nov 12, 2006 #13
    You all keep talking of the fly by wire technology.... could someone explain or outline just what you mean by it... i'm having difficulty understanding your conversations....
     
  15. Nov 12, 2006 #14

    LURCH

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    Fly-By-Wire just means that when the pilot moves a controll (the throttle or stick), he isn't directly moving the controll surfaces of the aircraft (the flaps, rudder, aelarons, etc.). He's just telling a computer what he wants the aircraft to do, and the computer makes the necessary adjustments to the controll surfaces, through electric servomotors. Without the computer making tiny adjustments about 40 times per second, most of today's jet fighters would be impossible to fly.
     
  16. Nov 12, 2006 #15
    Oh alright, so it just means that the aircraft maneuvres are automated.... and then where does this fly by wire term originate from
     
  17. Nov 12, 2006 #16

    FredGarvin

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    It originated from the fact that there is no mechanical linkage between the controls and the control surfaces. The only thing connecting them is the computer and wiring that goes to the actuators.
     
  18. Nov 12, 2006 #17
    Hi banerjeerupak,
    It does not necessarily mean that the manuevers are automated, because the pilot is still "in the loop" as we say. The pilot is still closing the aircraft control loop in his head.

    Automated control would be characterized by the computer itself (through autopilot control laws) closing the aircraft control loop. But a fly-by-wire (FBW)aircraft can still be flown manually (via stick and throttle).

    Fred's response hopefully gives you more insight as to what FBW means. But let me give you another visualization to see if that would help:

    Before FBW systems with computers and wires came into fashion, one could say that aircraft were controlled with "Fly By Cable" (FBC) systems. Mechanical cables transmitted the motion of the control stick and throttle to the surface actuators and the fuel metering valve. Now instead of mechanical cables, we have electronic position sensors on the stick and throttle that sense its position and encodes it into an electrical signal that goes to the flight control computer. The flight control computer then runs the software (called "control laws") that transform the pilot's inputs into electrical commands that are sent to the actuators and fuel metering valve.

    Hope that helps,
    Rainman
     
  19. Nov 12, 2006 #18
    A video in english

    http://video.yahoo.com/video/play?p....com/search/video?p=yak+141&toggle=1&ei=UTF-8

    Also carrier landing:

    http://www.youtube.com/p.swf?video_...EhF4/2.jpg&t=OEgsToPDskL55PDJhfS3PN1AMUqDmGfh

    I don't see what all the hype is for, the JSF is nothing new, nor novel for that matter. According to the wiki link, Lockheed just paid Yakovlev for the designs. They started the 141 back in 1975 and have put lots of money, time, and research into the thing. It's no wonder Lockheed won out to boeing.

    The plane even looks identical in every respect, only modernized.

    The yak-141 was 25 years ahead of its time.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2006
  20. Nov 13, 2006 #19
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  21. Nov 29, 2006 #20

    AlephZero

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    Nope, it all came from li'l ol' England. I know 'cos I was there at Rolls Royce.

    This was the first version of RR's VTOL testing. Strange that the best set of pictures of it has text in Russian :-)

    http://flatrock.org.nz/topics/flying/flying_bedstead.htm
    http://vtol.boom.ru/vtol/TMR/index.html

    I've seen BAE Harriers hundreds of times but there is still something very unnerving about seeing one fly a fast circuit and a landing approach, then just slow down and stop in mid air. Watching trainee pilots learning how to fly them backwards and sideways is also fun.

    http://www.vflintham.demon.co.uk/aircraft/harrier/harrier.htm
     
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