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Jumping in a train

  1. Jun 8, 2014 #1
    Hello. I've searched a lot on the internett on jumping inside a train, and I do only find solutions for the question "When u jump inside a train will u land at the same spot, whereas the train is moving u should land bit back".
    What happens if you are running and jumping backwards, would you jump further than when the train are standing still?
    http://i62.tinypic.com/2ev67uf.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 8, 2014
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  3. Jun 8, 2014 #2

    UltrafastPED

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  4. Jun 8, 2014 #3

    adjacent

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    When you are moving with the velocity speed as train, your position and direction changes with the same amount every time. If the train is not accelerating, and if you jump up, you, according to newton's first law, will move towards the direction you moved before,with the same speed. So you will land on the same position you jumped from.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2014 #4

    Nugatory

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    The surface of the earth is moving because of the earth's rotation about its axis; this speed is many hundreds of kilometers an hour, faster than any train. Is jumping towards the east, with the motion, any different than jumping towards the west, against the motion?
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2014
  6. Jun 8, 2014 #5

    Doc Al

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    Jump further with respect to whom? The train? Or the earth?
     
  7. Jun 8, 2014 #6

    adjacent

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    Or the Solar system or the Milkyway? I think the problem is getting more complex when we include all these
     
  8. Jun 8, 2014 #7

    Doc Al

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    Which is why I did not include them. But the train and the earth (the track) are essential frames of reference.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2014 #8
    That is actually what I want to find out. After reading about Galileo's ship I dont think ther are any difference.
     
  10. Jun 8, 2014 #9
    No, no difference aside from the Coriolis effect which will be utterly negligible in this case.
     
  11. Jun 8, 2014 #10

    Nugatory

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    That is indeed correct.
    The train, Galileo's ship, the surface of the earth.... They're all basically the same problem with the same answer. For many people it's easiest to see what's going on when they think about the earth, because we're already in the habit of thinking that the earth's surface is stationary.
     
  12. Jun 8, 2014 #11
  13. Jun 8, 2014 #12

    ZapperZ

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    You do know that our earth is also moving, with respect to some other reference frame, don't you? So why would someone jumping on a train be any different than what you already know about someone jumping on our ordinary earth?

    Zz.
     
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