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Jumping off a snow pile

  • Thread starter Drizzy
  • Start date
211
1
1. Homework Statement
The diagram shows a kid jumping off a snow pile into the grown that is also covered with snow. So the kid is jumping up and then lands on the ground.
https://scontent-arn2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpf1/v/t34.0-12/12380374_1234806623215387_1066477107_n.jpg?oh=fe84392440a1ddbf0eebf557109d56ec&oe=5677CAA8
The question is: how tall is the snow pile if the ground is 0 m?
2. Homework Equations

S=v0t + (at^2)/2

3. The Attempt at a Solution
I am thinking that the kid is at its highest point when the velocity is zero and t=0.4. It takes 0.4 seconds up and also 0.4 seconds down to the level where the snow pile was at. so the snow piles height is from 0.8 seconds to 1,2 seconds. 1.2-0.8=0.4
s= -4*0.4 + (9.82 * 0,4^2)/2 = - 0,8144

What went wrong in my assumptions or solution?

upload_2015-12-19_14-42-36.png
 

NascentOxygen

Mentor
9,182
1,030
If it's headed downwards, you are denoting this as a negative velocity, so g in your equation will likewise be negative.
 

gneill

Mentor
20,488
2,610
Also, when the velocity is at its most negative point, that's when the kid reaches the top of the layer of snow that's on the ground, not the ground itself. Ponder the finish of the velocity vs time graph.
 

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