Juno/JunoCam mission

  • #101
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Minor set back to contingency mode, hoping all ends up well. :smile:

http://spaceflight101.com/juno-prm-postponed/
Instead of spiraling down into a two-week science orbit around Jupiter, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will have to remain in a highly elliptical orbit for at least one more lap around the gaseous world due to a suspect signature seen in the preparatory steps for the critical main engine burn originally planned for next week.

After operating all its instruments for the ‘perijove’ passage, Juno was outbound again, set for a routine Orbital Trim Maneuver ahead of passing the high point of its orbit on September 23 and starting the inbound leg to what was known as ‘Period Reduction Maneuver’ - a rocket-powered braking maneuver to bring down the apojove distance and place the spacecraft into its two-week science orbit.

The engine firing was planned to begin around 18 UTC on October 19, eleven minutes before Juno passed only 4,180 Kilometers above Jupiter’s cloud tops. This maneuver is the final scheduled use of Juno’s LEROS-1B main engine that was responsible for a pair of Deep Space Maneuvers in 2012 and the Jupiter Orbit Insertion maneuver on July 4.

"Telemetry indicates that two helium check valves that play an important role in the firing of the spacecraft’s main engine did not operate as expected during a command sequence that was initiated yesterday," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA JPL. "The valves should have opened in a few seconds, but it took several minutes. We need to better understand this issue before moving forward with a burn of the main engine."

With a third Capture Orbit added to the mission, Juno is now looking forward to its second close pass by Jupiter that can be utilized for science data collection. Due to the mission’s orbital design, the close perijove passes of the Capture Orbits and the planned Science Orbit are very similar in terms of altitude and flight path - taking Juno from north to south with closest approach near the equator, offering excellent views of Jupiter’s polar regions.

The first close pass of Juno already revealed tantalizing new views of Jupiter provided by the spacecraft’s sole camera instrument, JunoCam. Data captured by the other instruments was by no means less spectacular, but scientists needed time to fully dive in and analyze the first close-up data peering below Jupiter’s dense cloud tops.

Passing Jupiter on Wednesday, Juno will be outbound again with its next close pass of the planet on December 11 which will be the next opportunity for the Period Reduction Maneuver - pending evaluations of the suspect check valve signature.

The option of a third Capture Orbit has be prepared as part of numerous contingency scenarios worked out for this mission, however, there is some urgency in getting Juno down into the science orbit due to the limited lifetime of the spacecraft in the extreme radiation environment of Jupiter.

Juno was set for a total of 36 orbits around Jupiter with its science phase lasting until February 6, 2018. Pending reviews of the spacecraft’s performance in the harsh radiation environment, a short mission extension will be assessed when the time comes.

Here is what JPL says.
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/mission-prepares-for-next-jupiter-pass
JUNO MISSION STATUS

Mission managers for NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter have decided to postpone the upcoming burn of its main rocket motor originally scheduled for Oct. 19. This burn, called the period reduction maneuver (PRM), was to reduce Juno’s orbital period around Jupiter from 53.4 to 14 days. The decision was made in order to further study the performance of a set of valves that are part of the spacecraft’s fuel pressurization system. The period reduction maneuver was the final scheduled burn of Juno’s main engine.

"Telemetry indicates that two helium check valves that play an important role in the firing of the spacecraft’s main engine did not operate as expected during a command sequence that was initiated yesterday," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "The valves should have opened in a few seconds, but it took several minutes. We need to better understand this issue before moving forward with a burn of the main engine."

After consulting with Lockheed Martin Space Systems of Denver and NASA Headquarters, Washington, the project decided to delay the PRM maneuver at least one orbit. The most efficient time to perform such a burn is when the spacecraft is at the part of its orbit which is closest to the planet. The next opportunity for the burn would be during its close flyby of Jupiter on Dec. 11.

Mission designers had originally planned to limit the number of science instruments on during Juno’s Oct. 19 close flyby of Jupiter. Now, with the period reduction maneuver postponed, all of the spacecraft’s science instruments will be gathering data during the upcoming flyby.

"It is important to note that the orbital period does not affect the quality of the science that takes place during one of Juno’s close flybys of Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "The mission is very flexible that way. The data we collected during our first flyby on August 27th was a revelation, and I fully anticipate a similar result from Juno’s October 19th flyby."
 
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  • #102
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I'm looking forward to Wednesday, :partytime:
From, http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/n...jupiter-mission-status-latest-science-results

Team members of NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter will discuss the latest science results, an amateur imaging processing campaign, and the recent decision to postpone a scheduled burn of its main engine, during a media briefing at 4 p.m. EDT Wednesday, Oct. 19. The briefing will air live on NASA Television and stream on the agency’s website.

Emily at planetary.com had an interesting take on things
http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2016/10161412-juno-to-delay-planned-burn.html

While it's true that the mission does have the flexibility to delay this orbit burn without affecting the quality of the science at periapsis or reducing the number of orbits Juno can eventually make, I am sure that the science teams are scrambling this weekend. They didn't have a plan in place to do science on this orbit periapsis; now they will have to put something together very fast (I imagine it will have many similarities to what they did on perijove 2). And delaying the period reduction maneuver also means a delay in the start of the science mission, and the calendar of future events will be changing a lot. Ground-based observers who planned to observe Jupiter at times corresponding to Juno periapses will have to try to change dates. Among the less important consequences of the calendar change is that all the moon science opportunities that Candy Hansen wrote about in her earlier guest post will now not happen, because any close approaches between Juno and the moons will be on different, as-yet-undetermined dates and different distances. It will take some time to determine when the observation opportunities are with the new orbit, and to plan those observations.

But it's always better to have a safe and healthy spacecraft whose science you need to replan, than to have an out-of-control spacecraft. I know that Juno is in good hands, and hope the engineering team will be able to get to the bottom of the check valve problem quickly. Best of luck to the Juno team!
 
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  • #103
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Today's Juno news...
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/juno-spacecraft-in-safe-mode-for-latest-jupiter-flyby

NASA’s Juno spacecraft entered safe mode Tuesday, Oct. 18 at about 10:47 p.m. PDT (Oct. 19 at 1:47 a.m. EDT). Early indications are a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft’s onboard computer. The spacecraft acted as expected during the transition into safe mode, restarted successfully and is healthy. High-rate data has been restored, and the spacecraft is conducting flight software diagnostics. All instruments are off, and the planned science data collection for today’s close flyby of Jupiter (perijove 2), did not occur.

"At the time safe mode was entered, the spacecraft was more than 13 hours from its closest approach to Jupiter," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We were still quite a ways from the planet’s more intense radiation belts and magnetic fields. The spacecraft is healthy and we are working our standard recovery procedure."

The spacecraft is designed to enter safe mode if its onboard computer perceives conditions are not as expected. In this case, the safe mode turned off instruments and a few non-critical spacecraft components, and it confirmed the spacecraft was pointed toward the sun to ensure the solar arrays received power.

Mission managers are continuing to study an unrelated issue with the performance of a pair of valves that are part of the spacecraft’s propulsion system. Last week the decision was made to postpone a burn of the spacecraft’s main engine that would have reduced Juno’s orbital period from 53.4 to 14 days.

The next close flyby is scheduled on Dec. 11, with all science instruments on.

The Juno science team continues to analyze returns from the first close flyby on Aug. 27. Revelations from that flyby include that Jupiter’s magnetic fields and aurora are bigger and more powerful than originally thought. Juno’s Microwave Radiometer instrument (MWR) also provided data that give mission scientists their first glimpse below the planet’s swirling cloud deck. The radiometer instrument can peer about 215 to 250 miles (350 to 400 kilometers) below Jupiter’s clouds.

"With the MWR data, it is as if we took an onion and began to peel the layers off to see the structure and processes going on below," said Bolton. "We are seeing that those beautiful belts and bands of orange and white we see at Jupiter’s cloud tops extend in some version as far down as our instruments can see, but seem to change with each layer."

The JunoCam public outreach camera also was operating during the Aug. 27 flyby. The raw images from that flyby (and all future flybys) were made available on the JunoCam website (www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam) for the public to not only peruse but to process into final image products. JunoCam is the first outreach camera to venture beyond the asteroid belt.

"JunoCam has a small operations team and no image processing team, so we took a leap of faith that the public would step up and help us generate images of Jupiter from the raw data," said Candy Hansen, JunoCam imaging scientist from the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona. "All sorts of people are coming to the JunoCam site and providing their own aesthetic. We have volunteers from all over the world, and they are doing beautiful work. So far all our expectations for JunoCam have not only been met but are being exceeded, and we’re just getting started."

The final image products include straightforward images of the solar system’s largest world, but also some with a certain artistic license, including a variation on Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night painting and even a "smiley face" made from an image of Jupiter’s south pole. These amateur-generated JunoCam images are not only being used to help interest the media and public in this mission to the most massive planet in the solar system, but are engaging Juno’s science team as well.

"The amateurs are giving us a different perspective on how to process images," said Hansen. "They are experimenting with different color enhancements, different highlights or annotations than we would normally expect. They are identifying storms tracked from Earth to connect our images to the historical record. This is citizen science at its best."
 
  • #104
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While we are waiting for the bugs to get worked out of Juno, here are some of the Junocam images. :woot:
South pole Junocam.jpg


south_poleee_sch.png


juno.jpg


Perijove1_v9.png


JupiterFromAbove.tif.converted-2016-09-03.16.16.02.png


pole again.png


Jupiter_Juno28082016a.jpg


pia21107-1041.jpg
 
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  • #105
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  • #106
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Here's the latest from JPL
http://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasas-juno-mission-exits-safe-mode-performs-trim-maneuver

NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter has left safe mode and has successfully completed a minor burn of its thruster engines in preparation for its next close flyby of Jupiter.

Mission controllers commanded Juno to exit safe mode Monday, Oct. 24, with confirmation of safe mode exit received on the ground at 10:05 a.m. PDT (1:05 p.m. EDT). The spacecraft entered safe mode on Oct. 18 when a software performance monitor induced a reboot of the spacecraft's onboard computer. The team is still investigating the cause of the reboot and assessing two main engine check valves.

"Juno exited safe mode as expected, is healthy and is responding to all our commands," said Rick Nybakken, Juno project manager from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "We anticipate we will be turning on the instruments in early November to get ready for our December flyby."

In preparation for that close flyby of Jupiter, Juno executed an orbital trim maneuver Tuesday at 11:51 a.m. PDT (2:51 p.m. EDT) using its smaller thrusters. The burn, which lasted just over 31 minutes, changed Juno’s orbital velocity by about 5.8 mph (2.6 meters per second) and consumed about 8 pounds (3.6 kilograms) of propellant. Juno will perform its next science flyby of Jupiter on Dec. 11, with time of closest approach to the gas giant occurring at 9:03 a.m. PDT (12:03 p.m. EDT). The complete suite of Juno’s science instruments, as well as the JunoCam imager, will be collecting data during the upcoming flyby.

"We are all excited and eagerly anticipating this next pass close to Jupiter," said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. "The science collected so far has been truly amazing."
 
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http://spacenews.com/nasa-investigating-possible-link-between-juno-and-intelsat-thruster-problems/

JPL spokesman D.C. Agle said Nov. 2 there were no updates on the Juno thruster investigation. He added, though, that the Dec. 11 close approach will be a "science pass," with no plans to fire the engine.

Green noted that Juno can still carry out its mission in its current orbit, since the bulk of the data it collects is during the close approaches to the planet. The maneuver, though, would reduce the spacecraft’s period from 53 to 14 days, giving it more flybys and opportunities to gather more data in a given period of time.

"We want to really take a good look at it and get it down into its lower orbit if at all possible," he said, "if we feel like that’s a risk we can take with the system that we have onboard."
 
  • #108
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Normally I'm very happy to hear of a mission being extended, however this "extension" is one I'm hoping doesn't come to pass. I really would like to see a successful burn accomplished to get the 14 day orbit established, At any rate the December pass should have more interesting data as long as another "safe mode event" doesn't occur. In the meantime "wait and see" is all anyone can do, still no word on the valve issue or a work around that will safely let the required burn be accomplished.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2016/11030800-juno-update.html
At the DPS/EPSC meeting last week, principal investigator Scott Bolton spoke about keeping Juno in its long, 53.5-day orbit for a long time, not ruling out the possibility of performing the entire mission in such an orbit. Juno only gets exposed to dangerous radiation when very close to Jupiter, so the spacecraft wouldn't be exposed to any additional radiation by doing this, though it would seriously prolong the mission. If the mission has not ended by September 2019, Jupiter will have traveled far enough around the Sun that Juno will pass into Jupiter's shadow for several hours on every orbit, a condition that it was not designed for and which could harm its power system; the mission would need to develop a solution to that problem.
 
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https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-juno-mission-prepares-for-december-11-jupiter-flyby
On Sunday, December 11, at 9:04 a.m. PST (12:04 p.m. EST, 17:04 UTC) NASA’s Juno spacecraft will make its third science flyby of Jupiter.

At the time of closest approach (called perijove), Juno will be about 2,580 miles (4,150 kilometers) above the gas giant’s roiling cloud tops and traveling at a speed of about 129,000 mph (57.8 kilometers per second) relative to the planet. Seven of Juno’s eight science instruments will be energized and collecting data during the flyby.

Mission managers have decided not to collect data with the Jovian Infrared Auroral Mapper (JIRAM) instrument during the December flyby, to allow the team to complete an update to the spacecraft software that processes JIRAM’s science data. A software patch allowing JIRAM’s operation is expected to be available prior to the next perijove pass (PJ4) on Feb. 2, 2017.

Apparently no one wants to gamble a functioning 1.1 billion dollar spacecraft, we may be in for 53.4 day orbits for a while, at least until JPL is feeling more confident in the main engine.

The spacecraft team continues to weigh its options regarding modifications of Juno’s orbital period -- how long it takes for the spacecraft to complete one orbit around Jupiter. At present, Juno’s orbital period is 53.4 days. There had been plans to perform a period adjustment maneuver with the spacecraft’s main engine on Oct. 19 to reduce the orbital period to 14 days. The team made the decision to forgo the maneuver in order to further study the performance of a set of valves that are part of the spacecraft's fuel pressurization system. The period reduction maneuver was the final scheduled burn of Juno's main engine.
 
  • #110
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Data is beginning to come in from the latest pass, I'll post what I can come up with.
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/spaceimages/details.php?id=pia21219
This image, taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft's JunoCam imager, highlights the seventh of Jupiter's eight 'string of pearls' -- massive counterclockwise rotating storms that appear as white ovals in the gas giants southern hemisphere. Since 1986, these white ovals have varied in number from six to nine. There are currently eight white ovals visible.
PIA21219_hires.jpg
 
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  • #111
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Still digging but here is a start.
http://spaceflight101.com/juno-delivers-new-data-from-jupiter-future-flight-plan-under-evaluation/

NASA’s Juno spacecraft brushed past Jupiter on Sunday, marking the mission’s first operational science data collection with seven of the craft’s instruments active as the probe zipped past the Gas Giant at a speed over 200,000 Kilometers per hour.

According to NASA, the close flyby was successful and Juno collected a full complement of science data that was being downlinked to Earth at the start of the week. The agency also announced that concrete plans on a possible orbital adjustment are still being worked out as the mission team, in coordination with spacecraft engineers, evaluate the available options for modifying Juno’s orbit.

Three options exist for the future of the Juno mission: 1) keeping the spacecraft in its current orbit with science passes every 53.5 days, 2) firing the main engine for a full or partial period reduction to increase the frequency of science passes, 3) employing the monopropellant reaction control system to accomplish a partial period reduction to avoid the risk of firing the main engine, though at the expense of maneuvering propellant that could be useful in an extended mission.
 
  • #112
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Here is one I haven't seen yet, It's from Perijove three on December 11th, looking at the southern Hemisphere from a distance of 37,000 km. ( I came across this on APOD, https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap161217.html) I'm going to have to look around and see what other "Jcam" images I've missed from the latest pass.
 
  • #113
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I'm going to have to look around and see what other "Jcam" images I've missed from the latest pass.
Well here's a start. :smile:
Not a bad composition here, definitely worth posting.
swirling.jpg


p 3.jpg


pearl etc..jpg


p 3 southern hemisphere.jpg


Northern sharpened.jpg


Deep blue.jpg


Northern Anticyclone.jpg


Auroras with Earth comparison.jpg
 
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