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Just a question

  1. Jul 28, 2012 #1
    I know that things moving closer to the speed of light will decay at slower rates, but does this include the decay of third generation quarks into second and then first generation quarks? If a third generation quark is created and in an area of the universe where things are moving extremely fast, would it decay into a second generation quark in a longer period of time than it normally would?
     
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2012
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 28, 2012 #2
    Yes. Time dilation slows all processes without exception. But bear in mind that an observer moving with the quarks would observe the normal decay rate.
     
  4. Jul 28, 2012 #3

    mfb

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    High-energetic B mesons live longer than low-energetic ones, this can be observed all the time in particle colliders. To avoid dealing with this, the decay time in the rest frame of the particle is calculated, while the decay time in the detector frame is rarely used.
     
  5. Jul 28, 2012 #4
    Thankyou. So I have another question for anyone who wants to answer. When we create collisions in particle accelerators we very rarely see Top, bottom, strange, and charm quarks because they decay into up and down quarks then connect to eachother with gluons. Is it possible that in another area of the universe where properties are different that third generation matter such as top and bottom quarks could remain stable long enough to bind together in a similar way that Up and Down quarks bind to make the mesons and baryons we know of? In which case it would be possible to have mesons, baryons, or atoms consisting just of quarks and leptons of the third or second family? Is it possible that this matter is created rapidly all the time but we just don't see it because it decays at an extreme rate?
     
  6. Jul 28, 2012 #5

    mfb

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    With the top-quark (and a quark-gluon-plasma and probably other exotic states) as exceptions, all quarks form hadrons.
    As example, "B mesons" is a name for mesons consisting of a bottom-quark and a lighter quark, bound together with gluons.

    Atoms with hyperons (a strange-quark instead of an up or down-quark) were observed, as far as I know, but in general, the produced quarks are too rare or high-energetic for that.

    Up to now, no experiment found any spatial or temporal variation of physics. The common view is that physics is probably the same everywhere.

    Stable second or third generation quarks would require that their masses are lower than the first generation quarks.
     
  7. Jul 28, 2012 #6
    Alright thankyou for answering my questions. I have one last question though. Is there a way I can change the title of this thread?
     
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