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  1. May 15, 2008 #1
    hi! people.

    I'm a web developer.

    but i'm interested in physics.

    from Philippines.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2008 #2

    lisab

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    Hi dirty9 - welcome to PF!!
     
  4. May 15, 2008 #3
    Hi dirty9,

    I'm a physicist.

    But I'm interested in web developement !

    Would you like to come over for dinner ? :tongue2:
     
  5. May 15, 2008 #4

    Danger

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    Welcome to PF, Dirty9.
    What's your favourite fish?
     
  6. May 15, 2008 #5
    Hello, welcome.
     
  7. May 15, 2008 #6
    Why do you want to learn web development humanino?
    and what part of web development?

    @danger
    Fish that makes my eyesight clearer.

    thank you.
     
  8. May 15, 2008 #7

    lisab

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    What a coincidence--I have a spider who is a web developer! His web site is the darkest corner of my kitchen :biggrin: .

    Hmmmm, a fish that makes your eyesight clearer...well if you eat a diet rich in omega-3 oils, it can reduce your chance of getting macular degeneration:

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/13804393

    But at PF we don't eat the fish, we use them to give (gentle...very gentle) welcome-slaps to newcomers.
     
  9. May 15, 2008 #8
    For my own server
    The gypsy guitar one :smile:
     
  10. May 15, 2008 #9

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    A mackerel up your nose.
     
  11. May 15, 2008 #10

    Math Is Hard

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    I'm an analyst, but I'm interested in physicists.
     
  12. May 15, 2008 #11
    I'm a guy, and I'm interested in Physicals




    (hmmm--I think there needs to be a few more qualifiers in that statement)
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2008
  13. May 15, 2008 #12

    Moonbear

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    Hmm...I always thought it was your psychology studies that made you interested in physicists. :biggrin:

    I'm not so fussy, I'm interested in both physicists and engineers. :biggrin: Oh, and I'm a biologist.
     
  14. May 15, 2008 #13

    Evo

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    I'm interested in physicists and industrial microbiologists.

    Oh and mad scientist inventors. :biggrin: I'm watching him now on the "tv" he set up. This is fun. Impressive, he's been building this thing for awhile now and hasn't injured himself once.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2008
  15. May 15, 2008 #14

    tiny-tim

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    People who need fish …
    :smile: … are the luckiest people in the world … ! :smile:
     
  16. May 15, 2008 #15

    The fish? it's not a slap for me i knew it was a logical question regarding physics.
    But i have the right to answer it my way because physics is not my field.

    thank again guys.
     
  17. May 15, 2008 #16

    Danger

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    http://img247.imageshack.us/img247/1277/hackerpfjpg0nu.gif [Broken]

    Sorry... I couldn't help it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  18. May 15, 2008 #17

    Redbelly98

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    That reminds me of an old proverb, I think it went like this:

    Teach a man to fish and he will pay you for a day.
    Give a man fish, and he will pay you for a lifetime.
     
  19. May 15, 2008 #18

    Evo

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    It's a proverb from the bible which goes something like
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2008
  20. May 15, 2008 #19
    Are you guys familiar or support "Distributed Computing Projects" like boinc?

    just curious.
     
  21. May 15, 2008 #20

    Redbelly98

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    Evo, yes, that's it. I should have put a smiley or "jk" after my post :-)
     
  22. May 15, 2008 #21

    Danger

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    I liked Yomamma's version a lot better, but a forums search won't acknowledge his existence.
    The best that I can recall, without being able to find the original, is:
    Give a man fire, and he'll be warm for a day.
    Set a man on fire, and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.
     
  23. May 15, 2008 #22

    Moonbear

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    :rofl:
     
  24. May 15, 2008 #23

    Evo

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    :rofl: I remember that!
     
  25. May 15, 2008 #24

    Evo

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    It just reminds me that there was this one guy at work that we hired and he was worthless. What we refer to as a "hiring mistake". The guy couldn't do anything on his own, completely unable to make a decision. No matter how many times you told him what to do he would still ask every single time. Finally my boss came to me and told me that she couldn't take the guy anymore, she couldn't get anything done, he was always asking her what to do. So I told her to send him to me.

    When he got to my office I said "Sit down David, I'm going to teach you how to fish."
    Anyway, we fired him, he couldn't fish. :biggrin:
     
  26. May 15, 2008 #25

    Math Is Hard

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    They actually do come up in the literature now and then, often in a field called Perceptual Learning. There's some very interesting work on how experts and novices perceive and classify problems. Physics problems are sometimes used in this research.

    Novices tend to classify problems by surface-level features. Experts consistently ignore these, readily perceiving the underlying structure of a problem, and using this as the categorization basis. Here's an example of the difference in classifying schemes and reasoning:

    http://www.nap.edu/html/howpeople1/ch2_f4.html

    The Perceptual Learning take on this is that becoming an expert doesn't just entail gathering lots and lots of knowledge, often there are dramatic changes in perception and attention. When examining a problem, suppression of the irrelevant features available to a person's attention is as critical as the enhancement of relevant ones. It's much like a transition from serial to parallel search. The important structural invariants just pop out as a whole for the experts, while the novices wade through irrelevant perceptual distractors seeking structure.

    ok, whoa, I'm rambling. :redface:
     
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